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Search results for Split and Reassemble Files

Unix+clones

Split and Reassemble Files

Post date: September 20, 2006, 20:09 Category: Software Views: 4186 Comments
Tutorial quote: There always comes a time, where you wish that file was only a few kilobytes/megabytes smaller. Wether it be so it can fit onto your floppy disk, CDR etc, or so you can meet the attachment limit on an e-mail server. This isn't really a command that you would use everyday, but it might come in handy.
Linux

Backup and Restore Linux Partitions Using Partimage

Post date: January 22, 2007, 18:01 Category: Installing Views: 3010 Comments
Tutorial quote: Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX utility which saves partitions in many formats (see below) to an image file. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable floppies (ZIP for example), … Partitions can be saved across the network since version 0.6.0.When using Partimage, the partitions must be unmounted.
Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 2545 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
Linux

Introduction to Linux files

Post date: April 12, 2005, 16:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2461 Comments
Tutorial quote: This newbie-level Linux tutorial is an introduction to handling files from the Linux command line. It will cover finding files, determining their type, renaming, copying, examining their attributes, reading their contents, and, in the case of binary files, how to get clues to learn something more about them. Further reading will be suggested for editing files since that topic is beyond the scope of this article.
Ubuntu

Recover deleted files from NTFS filesystem from Ubuntu Linux - Ntfsundelete

Post date: October 10, 2010, 05:10 Category: Security Views: 4133 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have accidentally deleted files from your hard drive, don't panic! You can easily recover deleted files whether you are using a Windows PC (NTFS) or Linux OS. You can undelete files with almost guaranteed success. The most important thing is to act as soon as you realize that the files are lost.
Debian

How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster With MySQL 5.1

Post date: June 17, 2008, 09:06 Category: Installing Views: 3358 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5.1 cluster with five nodes: 1 x management, 2 x storage nodes and 2 x balancer nodes. This cluster is load-balanced by an Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).
Linux

Linux Directory Structure

Post date: December 26, 2007, 15:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4399 Comments
Tutorial quote: The directory structure of Linux/other Unix-like systems is very intimidating for the new user, especially if he/she is migrating from Windows. In Windows, almost all programs install their files (all files) in the directory named: `Program Files.’ Such is not the case in Linux. The directory system categorises all installed files. All configuration files are in /etc, all binary files are in /bin or /usr/bin or /usr/local/bin. Here is the entire directory structure along with what they contain.
Ubuntu

Dual-Booting Windows XP/Vista And Ubuntu 7.04

Post date: July 21, 2007, 00:07 Category: Desktop Views: 4288 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will teach you how to dual-boot between Windows XP/Vista and Ubuntu. This tutorial will be split up into two parts: Part one for people who have no operating system installed. Part two for people who have Windows XP/Vista installed and do not want to re-install Windows.
Ubuntu

SSHerminator - Nice split screen terminal emulator and SSH client

Post date: February 19, 2009, 08:02 Category: System Views: 3800 Comments
Tutorial quote: SSHerminator is a terminal emulator based on Terminator, with extra SSH features.The aim of this project is not to provide a standard, general use Terminal emulator, but an emulator that provides as rich an experience as possible while using SSH (that can also be used as a standard terminal).SSHerminator is a semi-fork of Terminator. We sync up with the Terminator code as often as possible, to get the best Terminator features, but include our SSH hacks.
Unix+clones

Backing up your files with rsync

Post date: October 14, 2007, 15:10 Category: Network Views: 3679 Comments
Tutorial quote: Backing up files on a regular basis is an integral part of administering your server.

One way is to download each and every file when you want to save them. However, rsync makes the task a lot easier as it only downloads files that have changed - saving time and bandwidth.
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