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Unix+clones

Apache Maintenance Basics

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Software Views: 3038 Comments
Tutorial quote: You've downloaded and configured your Apache server and are ready to move on to the next project. Can it really be left to fend for itself in a darkened room?

Yes. To some degree, anyway. With the exception of configuration testing, once Apache is up, you likely need never think about how the Web server is running.

On the other hand, completely ignoring your Apache installation would be foolhardy. Doing some regular checks and maintenance on your Apache installation helps identify any issues — usually before they even become issues — and helps you stay up date with the latest security and performance patches. This article covers some of the major steps and maintenance tasks that should be regularly undertaken while the Apache system is running.
Solaris

Configuring Apache

Post date: April 13, 2005, 05:04 Category: Network Views: 4352 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache can respond to browser requests from machines on your local network (i.e. an "Intranet" Web server) or from the Internet. The installation of the Solaris OS installed and set up most of the necessary Apache files. As a result, if you want to use your system as a Web server you only need to modify one file.
Unix+clones

Python Programming for Beginners

Post date: September 19, 2006, 09:09 Category: Programming Views: 44802 Comments
Tutorial quote: Despite what assembly code and C coders might tell us, high-level languages do have their place in every programmer's toolbox, and some of them are much more than a computer-science curiosity. Out of the many high-level languages we can choose from today, Python seems to be the most interesting for those who want to learn something new and do real work at the same time. Its no-nonsense implementation of object-oriented programming and its clean and easy-to-understand syntax make it a language that is fun to learn and use, which is not something we can say about most other languages.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to write applications that use command-line options, read and write to pipes, access environment variables, handle interrupts, read from and write to files, create temporary files and write to system logs. In other words, you will find recipes for writing real applications instead of the old boring Hello, World! stuff.
OpenBSD

Apache - Serving up the Web

Post date: April 11, 2006, 22:04 Category: Network Views: 7757 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache Web Server is installed as part of the OpenBSD base system. This guide will help you configure the web server: (Apache 1.3.12 is released with OpenBSD 2.7 and 1.3.9 with OpenBSD 2.6)

To see how configurable the Apache/OpenBSD combination is we also look at allowing administrators to remotely review the server's status, we setup the system so we allow users on our system to have their own personal web-space. Of course, for the security counscious you probably want to turn some of these things off after you get things up and running.
Linux

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: April 1, 2006, 03:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 4576 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU etc. But, most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on the Linux systems.
Unix+clones

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Post date: February 12, 2006, 09:02 Category: Optimizing Views: 4076 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache is an open-source HTTP server implementation. It is the most popular web server on the Internet; the December 2005 Web Server Survey conducted by Netcraft [1] shows that about 70% of the web sites on Internet are using Apache.

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU, etc. But most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on Linux systems. Of course, it is assumed that there is enough hardware resources - especially enough RAM that the server isn't swapping frequently. First two sections look into various Compile-Time and Run-Time configuration options. The Run-Time section assumes that Apache is compiled with prefork MPM. HTTP compression and caching is discussed next. Finally, using separate servers for serving static and dynamic contents is covered. Basic knowledge of compiling and configuring Apache and Linux are assumed.
Debian

Secure Your Apache With mod_security

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Security Views: 5192 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows how to install and configure mod_security. mod_security is an Apache module (for Apache 1 and 2) that provides intrusion detection and prevention for web applications. It aims at shielding web applications from known and unknown attacks, such as SQL injection attacks, cross-site scripting, path traversal attacks, etc.

In the first chapter I will show how to install mod_security on Debian Sarge, Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake), and on Fedora Core 5, and in the second chapter I will describe how to configure Apache for mod_security which is independent from the distribution you're using.

I want to say first that this is not the only way of setting up such a system. There are many ways of achieving this goal but this is the way I take. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!
Debian

How To Set Up A Loadbalanced High-Availability Apache Cluster

Post date: April 28, 2006, 06:04 Category: Network Views: 4259 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a two-node Apache web server cluster that provides high-availability. In front of the Apache cluster we create a load balancer that splits up incoming requests between the two Apache nodes. Because we do not want the load balancer to become another "Single Point Of Failure", we must provide high-availability for the load balancer, too. Therefore our load balancer will in fact consist out of two load balancer nodes that monitor each other using heartbeat, and if one load balancer fails, the other takes over silently.
Ubuntu

How To Set Up A Loadbalanced High-Availability Apache Cluster On Ubuntu 8.04 LTS

Post date: June 12, 2008, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 3403 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a two-node Apache web server cluster that provides high-availability. In front of the Apache cluster we create a load balancer that splits up incoming requests between the two Apache nodes. Because we do not want the load balancer to become another "Single Point Of Failure", we must provide high-availability for the load balancer, too. Therefore our load balancer will in fact consist out of two load balancer nodes that monitor each other using heartbeat, and if one load balancer fails, the other takes over silently.
RedHat

RH 9.0 Apache 2.0.47 + Tomcat 4.1.27 HOWTO

Post date: April 9, 2006, 14:04 Category: Software Views: 6480 Comments
Tutorial quote: Building an Apache HTTP + Tomcat environment is five major steps.
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