Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for Squeeze Your Gigabit NIC for Top Performance

Unix+clones

Apache Maintenance Basics

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Software Views: 3224 Comments
Tutorial quote: You've downloaded and configured your Apache server and are ready to move on to the next project. Can it really be left to fend for itself in a darkened room?

Yes. To some degree, anyway. With the exception of configuration testing, once Apache is up, you likely need never think about how the Web server is running.

On the other hand, completely ignoring your Apache installation would be foolhardy. Doing some regular checks and maintenance on your Apache installation helps identify any issues — usually before they even become issues — and helps you stay up date with the latest security and performance patches. This article covers some of the major steps and maintenance tasks that should be regularly undertaken while the Apache system is running.
OpenSUSE

Read - Write support for NTFS partition on OpenSuse 11.x

Post date: January 12, 2009, 08:01 Category: Desktop Views: 3696 Comments
Tutorial quote: The ntfs-3g driver is an open source, GPL licensed, third generation Linux NTFS driver which was implemented by the Linux-NTFS project. It provides full read-write access to NTFS, excluding access to encrypted files, writing compressed files, changing file ownership, access right.

Technically it's based on and a major improvement to the third generation Linux NTFS driver, ntfsmount. The improvements includes functionality, quality and performance enhancements.
Debian

Firebird database Configuration

Post date: May 5, 2006, 17:05 Category: Installing Views: 2502 Comments
Tutorial quote: Firebird is a relational database offering many ANSI SQL-99 features that runs on Linux, Windows, and a variety of Unix platforms. Firebird offers excellent concurrency, high performance, and powerful language support for stored procedures and triggers. It has been used in production systems, under a variety of names since 1981.

Firebird is a commercially independent project of C and C++ programmers, technical advisors and supporters developing and enhancing a multi-platform relational database management system based on the source code released by Inprise Corp (now known as Borland Software Corp) under the InterBase Public License v.1.0 on 25 July, 2000.
Linux

Building a Linux Cluster, Part 1

Post date: April 18, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 2743 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux clusters have escaped. As the general popularity of the Linux operating system increases, more complex solutions built with it are becoming increasingly common in the "traditional" (more conservative) IT world. Linux computer clusters, whose provenance was originally universities and research institutions such as the U.S. National Laboratories, are showing up in increasing numbers as high-performance computing solutions within such areas as oil and gas exploration, computer-aided engineering, visualization, and software development. Linux clusters providing highly-available web, mail, and other infrastructure services are also increasingly common. If past computing history is any indicator of future trends, widespread use of Linux clusters in the mainstream IT world cannot be far behind.
Unix+clones

Installing and securing Squid

Post date: March 13, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 5301 Comments
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 8176 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Unix+clones

Get More Out of Your Pipe with Apache and mod_gzip

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 2836 Comments
Tutorial quote: Some Web sites seem like they are designed to annoy and alienate visitors. Teeny tiny fixed fonts, weirdo fixed page widths, ad servers on Mars, and the content won't load until the ads do, and all kinds of dynamic jiggery-pokery that does everything but quickly deliver a nice, readable page.

Webmasters who are serious about running high-performance Web servers, and who want pleased and delighted visitors, have a great tool in Apache 1.3's mod_gzip. mod_gzip compresses pages on the fly, reducing their size considerably. Depending on the types of files served, you'll see size reductions ranging from 20%- 80%, and a nice increase in server efficiency. Nothing is needed on the client side, except sane modern Web browsers like Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, Galeon, and Konqueror. Mozilla, Firefox, and Opera are nice cross-platform browsers with all kinds of neat features, so don't be afraid to standardize on one of them.
Yellow+Dog

Installing Linux on the Mac mini

Post date: May 11, 2005, 12:05 Category: Installing Views: 6813 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Mac mini is an ideal low-cost, high-performance PowerPC development platform for numerous applications. Learn how to install and configure Linux on the mini. Future articles will add the software required to make it into a stand-alone multimedia appliance.

This short series of articles shows you how to take a conveniently inexpensive, high-end PowerPC® platform (specifically, an Apple Mac mini) and build it into a home multimedia appliance using Linux™. At the end of the series, you'll have a stand-alone device that can play slide shows of images, audio, and movies, and that is controlled and administered from another machine using a standard Web browser.

The PowerPC platform is very well-suited to this type of multimedia application, and the G4 with AltiVec used in the Mac mini is an exceptionally powerful and flexible choice. This first article introduces you to the hardware's capabilities and walks you through installing and configuring Yellow Dog Linux so you can delve into some application code in the next article.
OpenSUSE

Ext4 support on OpenSuse 11.1

Post date: January 5, 2009, 10:01 Category: System Views: 4402 Comments
Tutorial quote: Kernel 2.6.28 Released

Torvald released the final version of Linux Kernel 2.6.28. It's not a big change since RC 9, but it finally appeared as final after lots of discussion on LKML whether to postpone the release or release earlier and make the merge window longer as the developers goes on long holidays.

Here's some summary of Kernel 2.6.28 (taken from KernelNewbies): Linux 2.6.28 adds the first version of Ext4 as a stable filesystem, the much-expected GPU memory manager which will be the foundation of a renewed graphic stack, support for Ultra Wide Band (Wireless USB, UWB-IP), memory management scalability and performance improvements, a boot tracer, disk shock protection, the phonet network protocol, support of SSD discard requests, transparent proxy support, several new network drivers, controlable IO CPU affinity, high-resolution poll()/select(), support of a minimal "dummy" policy in SELinux, tracing improvements, x86 x2APIC support, a fb driver for VIA UniChrome devices, Mitac Mio A701 ARM-based smartphone support, some new drivers, improved device support, and many other small improvements and fixes.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink