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Search results for Squeeze Your Gigabit NIC for Top Performance

Debian

Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 2777 Comments
Tutorial quote: "Munin" means "memory".

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine "what's different today" when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you're doing capacity wise on all limited resources.

It uses the excellent RRDTool and is written in Perl. Munin has a master/node architecture in which the master connects to all the nodes at regular intervals and asks them for sdata. It then stores the data in RRD files, and (if needed) updates the graphs. One of the main goals has been ease of creating new plugins (graphs).
Linux

Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3144 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
RedHat

Tips & tricks: Performance tuning

Post date: November 26, 2005, 00:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 9481 Comments
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.
OSX

Enhancing Performance Of Mac OS X

Post date: December 29, 2005, 14:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 6859 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are certain things that would help Mac OS X perform well and be more responsive (you could say 'snappy'). Here are some ways to eliminate the typical bottlenecks.
Debian

BackupPC Installation And Configuration

Post date: June 19, 2006, 15:06 Category: Software Views: 3438 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackupPC is a high-performance, enterprise-grade system for backing up Linux and WinXX PCs and laptops to a server's disk. BackupPC is highly configurable and easy to install and maintain.
Openfiler

Installing and Configuring Openfiler with DRBD and Heartbeat

Post date: October 26, 2008, 13:10 Category: Installing Views: 12294 Comments
Tutorial quote: Openfiler is a high performance operating system tailored for use as a SAN/NAS appliance. This configuration will enable two Openfiler appliances to work in an active/passive high availability scenario.
CentOS

Installing The PHP-MemCache Module On CentOS 5.0

Post date: July 16, 2007, 23:07 Category: Optimizing Views: 6683 Comments
Tutorial quote: MemCached is a high-performance, distributed memory object caching system, generic in nature, but intended for use in speeding up dynamic web applications by alleviating database load. In this article I explain how you can very easily install it and make it avaible in PHP.
CentOS

System Monitoring with the Sysstat package

Post date: August 18, 2006, 07:08 Category: System Views: 3970 Comments
Tutorial quote: A system administrator needs to know how systems are performing. Using the Sysstat package, this tutorial will show how to monitor a system for performance.

FreeBSD

Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd

Post date: December 1, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 8175 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part I

Post date: May 16, 2005, 23:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 4138 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have complained about the speed of OpenOffice.org or Firefox or about the amount of time Linux takes to boot up, this set of optimizations should change your perception. Linux can boot up quickly, the word processor can spring open and the browser can fly. So, let's make these adjustments so your computer can fly.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink