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Linux+Mint

Installation Guide: Linux Mint 4.0 Daryna (a.k.a. The Perfect Desktop)

Post date: November 22, 2007, 11:11 Category: Desktop Views: 5254 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 4.0 (Daryna) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 4.0 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 7.10 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.
Gentoo

Enterprise Volume Management System Mini How-To

Post date: April 13, 2005, 20:04 Category: System Views: 4491 Comments
Tutorial quote: Here is a rough write-up on how I installed Gentoo 1.4_rc1 on EVMS, with the exception of the root partition. If you choose so, see the EVMS Howto for instructions on how to mount your root file system on an EVMS volume. I felt the hassle of dealing with a EVMS (or LVM, for that matter) root outweighs its advantages.

This is a very basic setup I used for my laptop. I only needed it so I don't have to worry about getting the partition sizes right from the beginning and to be able to adjust them with ease in the future. I've been using LVM with success but I couldn't find a way to resize the volume group itself. This, the fact that afaik there is no support for LVM in kernel 2.5.x and a new laptop needing a fresh installation made me try EVMS.
CentOS

Zimbra Collaboration Suite Open Source Edition On CentOS

Post date: March 13, 2008, 11:03 Category: Installing Views: 6269 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up Zimbra Collaboration Suite - Open Source Edition on CentOS. This tutorial covers installation of CentOS, dependencies for ZCS and setup of Split DNS when working behind a firewall. This tutorial is based on the way I set this server up and is only a suggestion. It carries no guarantees and it is highly suggested that you do this on a test server first to verify functionality. If you don't have a test server available you should download VMWare Server 1.0 and perform this tutorial on a test virtual server.
Ubuntu

Windows to Ubuntu Transition Guide

Post date: April 8, 2006, 15:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 12354 Comments
Tutorial quote: Alright, so you have successfully installed Ubuntu Linux, but now what do you do with it? You are in the right place. I am going to get you started with a guide on how to use your new Ubuntu system. This transition guide is targeted at existing Windows users and will show you how to do program installations, a little system configuration, but primarily highlight some Windows "replacement" programs for common applications you can't live without. This guide's intent is to introduce you to equivalent programs to what you are accustomed to and, hopefully, to cover a good amount of what you might want in a new install. I am basing the content on what I have personally experienced, email feedback from my installation article, questions from the PC Mech Forums, and common topics from the Ubuntu Forums. Hopefully this will answer a lot of questions you may have before you ever have them.
Linux

Comprehensive Linux System Services List: Explanation and Recommendation

Post date: December 17, 2007, 06:12 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4343 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux services are basically programs that start at boot time to provide certain features and services (Apache, the web server for example). After installation, every Linux distribution provides a list of enabled services. However, you might not need some of these services or you might need others that are not enabled by default. Having only the services you need running will make your system faster, more stable and secure. So the first thing you need to do after installing a Linux distribution is to manually edit the list of enabled services. Unfortunately, some services don’t provide a description, others provide a description that’s not understandable so you might end-up disabling a vital system service just because you didn’t know what it did and you thought you didn’t need it.
Debian

Creating a Wiki with kwiki

Post date: December 17, 2005, 22:12 Category: Software Views: 3420 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Debian

Using the 'snort' Intrusion Detection System

Post date: December 27, 2005, 15:12 Category: Security Views: 5498 Comments
Tutorial quote: Snort is the leading open source Network Intrusion Detection System and is a valuable addition to the security framework at any site. Even if you are employing lots of preventative measures, such as firewalling, patching, etc., a detection system can give you an assurance that your defences truly are effective, or if not, will give you valuable information about what you need to improve.

Fortunately, there is a good set of snort packages for Debian which takes a lot of the tedious work out of building a useful Network Intrusion Detection System. Before we start on installation, we should review a few details about the networking satack that you're going to need to make sense of the alerts snort will generate. Impatient readers and those who are familiar with the TCP/IP suite of protocols may do now skip to the bit that says Stand alone snort.
RedHat

Taking advantage of SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Security Views: 4671 Comments
Tutorial quote: The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 debuts the first commercially supported inclusion of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). An installation of Red Hat's latest enterprise operating system has SELinux installed and enabled by default. In the past SELinux has been criticized for a lack of commercial support, many big sites were unable to use it due to the lack of support (Fedora Core 3 doesn't have the support that they require). Now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, SELinux is a supported part of the OS, and such objections to the use of SELinux have gone away. SELinux is now widely regarded as being suitable for the largest sites.
OpenSUSE

Installation/Configuration of Last.fm Scrobbler/Player for linux

Post date: April 20, 2009, 09:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 5518 Comments
Tutorial quote: Last.fm is a UK-based Internet radio and music community website, founded in 2002. It claims over 30 million active users based in more than 200 countries.

Using a music recommender system called "Audioscrobbler", Last.fm builds a detailed profile of each user's musical taste by recording details of all the songs the user listens to, either on the streamed radio stations, the user's computer or some portable music devices. This information is transferred to Last.fm's database ("scrobbled") via a plug in installed into the user's music player. The profile data is then displayed on the user's profile page. The site offers numerous social networking features and can recommend and play artists similar to the user's favorites.
Ubuntu

Running SugarCRM Community Edition On Nginx (LEMP) (Debian Squeeze/Ubuntu 11.04)

Post date: November 3, 2011, 08:11 Category: Installing Views: 21724 Comments
Tutorial quote: SugarCRM is a webbased CRM solution written in PHP. SugarCRM is available in different flavours called "Editions" ("Community" (free), "Professional", and "Enterprise"). In this tutorial I will describe the installation of the free Community Edition on a Debian Squeeze or Ubuntu 11.04 system that has nginx installed instead of Apache (LEMP = Linux + nginx (pronounced "engine x") + MySQL + PHP). With the modules My Portal, Calendar, Activities, Contacts, Accounts, Leads, Opportunities, Cases, Bugtracker, Documents and Email, SugarCRM Community Edition offers everything that can be expected from a CRM solution.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink