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Debian

The Perfect Server - Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) With BIND & Dovecot [ISPConfig 3]

Post date: October 21, 2010, 11:10 Category: Installing Views: 4118 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to prepare a Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) server for the installation of ISPConfig 3, and how to install ISPConfig 3. ISPConfig 3 is a webhosting control panel that allows you to configure the following services through a web browser: Apache web server, Postfix mail server, MySQL, BIND nameserver, PureFTPd, SpamAssassin, ClamAV, and many more. This tutorials differs from "The Perfect Server - Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) With MyDNS & Courier [ISPConfig 3]" in that I use BIND and Dovecot here instead of MyDNS and Courier (of course, the other two variants - BIND & Courier or MyDNS & Dovecot are possible as well).
Unix+clones

SpamAssassin, ClamAV and Procmail Howto

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 3801 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install SpamAssassin (for filtering SPAM) and ClamAV (for filtering viruses, trojans, worms, etc.) and how to invoke them by using procmail recipes. It is suitable for scenarios where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to local users. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems. I tested it on Debian Woody so far.

In the end you will have a system where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to a local user; the emails are passed to procmail which invokes SpamAssassin and ClamAV in order to filter the emails before they arrive in the user's inbox. However, the installation of Sendmail and Postfix are not covered in this document.

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
Unix+clones

Installing and securing Squid

Post date: March 13, 2006, 15:03 Category: Software Views: 5704 Comments
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
Windows

Three Ways To Access Linux Partitions (ext2/ext3) From Windows On Dual-Boot Systems

Post date: January 20, 2008, 12:01 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 7984 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have a dual-boot Windows/Linux system, you probably know this problem: you can access files from your Windows installation while you are in Linux, but not the other way round. This tutorial shows three ways how you can access your Linux partitions (with ext2 or ext3 filesystem) from within Windows: Explore2fs, DiskInternals Linux Reader, and the Ext2 Installable File System For Windows. While the first two provide read-only access, the Ext2 Installable File System For Windows can be used for read and write operations.
Debian

Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 3162 Comments
Tutorial quote: "Munin" means "memory".

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine "what's different today" when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you're doing capacity wise on all limited resources.

It uses the excellent RRDTool and is written in Perl. Munin has a master/node architecture in which the master connects to all the nodes at regular intervals and asks them for sdata. It then stores the data in RRD files, and (if needed) updates the graphs. One of the main goals has been ease of creating new plugins (graphs).
Ubuntu

Setting up an Ubuntu media server

Post date: April 23, 2008, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 15440 Comments
Tutorial quote: In today's tip I'm going to run through how to setup an Ubuntu media server. First of all, what is Ubuntu. Wikipedia says:

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, and servers. It has consistently been rated among the most popular of the many GNU/Linux distributions. Ubuntu's goals include providing an up-to-date yet stable operating system for the average user and having a strong focus on usability and ease of installation.

It is very much like apache, which I showed you how to setup in my article on how to make your computer into a local server, in that it is commonly used as a server software. Now then, what is a media server?

To refer to Wikipedia again, a media server is

A media server is a computer appliance, ranging from an enterprise class machine providing video on demand, to, more commonly, a small home computer storing various digital media.

Basically, it's just like a local server which stores and shares solely media instead of other types of files. I'll leave the uses of one to your imagination. Let's on with setting it up.
Debian

How To Speed Up Drupal 7.7 With Boost And nginx (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: August 21, 2011, 18:08 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3010 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can speed up your Drupal 7.7 installation on a LAMP stack (Debian Squeeze) with the help of Boost and nginx. Boost provides static page caching for Drupal enabling a very significant performance and scalability boost for sites that receive mostly anonymous traffic. Boost makes sure that your logged-in users always get fresh content by not caching pages for logged-in users. In a first step I will show how to make your site faster by enabling Boost on a normal LAMP stack (Apache2, PHP, MySQL), and in a second step I explain how to make your site even faster by using nginx as a reverse proxy sitting in front of Apache and delivering the static HTML pages cached by Boost. nginx delivers static files a lot of faster than Apache and uses less memory/CPU.
Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 3223 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 4273 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
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