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Search results for Taking backup using tar command in linux and unix

Linux

Taking backup using tar command in linux and unix

Post date: April 18, 2006, 15:04 Category: Installing Views: 2200 Comments
Tutorial quote: The tar backup program is an archiving program designed to store and extract files from an archive file known as a tarfile. A tarfile may be made on a tape drive; however, it is also common to write a tarfile to a normal file.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2696 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
OpenSUSE

Tomboy - Desktop Note Taking in openSUSE Linux

Post date: August 31, 2008, 18:08 Category: Desktop Views: 3214 Comments
Tutorial quote: Tomboy is a desktop note-taking application for Linux and Unix. Simple and easy to use, but with potential to help you organize the ideas and information you deal with every day. Tomboy is written in C# and utilizes the Mono runtime and Gtk#. Automatic spell-checking is provided by GtkSpell.
Linux

Scheduling Backup Jobs using at and crontab

Post date: April 21, 2006, 16:04 Category: Installing Views: 2166 Comments
Tutorial quote: You can schedule a command or a script using two tools

crontab : Schedules tasks once or repeatedly.

You can use the crontab command to run commands at regular times. For example, you could schedule a backup of your files every Friday. Commands can be scheduled to the minute.

at : Schedules tasks once.

You can use the at command to schedule a command or script to run a single time. The command includes several utilities
Ubuntu

Back In Time – A Simple backup tool for ubuntu

Post date: July 15, 2009, 21:07 Category: Software Views: 4564 Comments
Tutorial quote: Back In Time is a simple backup tool for Linux inspired from “flyback project” and “TimeVault”.The backup is done by taking snapshots of a specified set of directories.Keep in mind that Back In Time is just a GUI. The real magic is done by rsync (take snapshots and restore), diff (check if somethind changed) and cp (make hardlinks).
Unix+clones

Remote backup using ssh, tar and cron

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2843 Comments
Tutorial quote: Are you looking for a solution to backup your data to a remote location? While a solid backup solution such as Arkeia or TSM from IBM are nice from an enterprise point of view, simpler solutions are available from a home user's perspective. I will walk you through on you how you can backup your data to a remote server, using the default tools available on all linux systems. In a nutshell, we will use ssh capabilities to allow a cron job to transfer a tarball from you local machine to a remote machine.

For the purpose of this tutorial, the local machine will be called “localmachine” (running slackware) and the remote server will be called “remoteserver” (slackware as well). The user will be joe (me). You will have to substitute those 3 with your own machines names and user.
Ubuntu

Creating Backups With Back In Time On An Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop

Post date: August 25, 2009, 11:08 Category: Desktop Views: 2377 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to install and use Back In Time on an Ubuntu 9.04 desktop. Back In Time is a simple backup tool for Linux inspired from "flyback project" and "TimeVault". The backup is done by taking snapshots of a specified set of directories.
Linux

HOWTO backup your linux system using bash, tar and netcat

Post date: April 2, 2006, 22:04 Category: System Views: 2717 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently ran into the problem of not having enough hard drive space on my slackware linux laptop, but was lucky enough to have a much bigger drive sitting around from before and wanted a way to perform a hassle free seamless upgrade. i had this idea and it worked pretty well so i thought i would share it since i think it's pretty cool and only requires the use of two tools that should be included with all distributions.
Ubuntu

Disk ARchive (Backup and Restore) using dar and kdar(dar Frontend)

Post date: January 12, 2007, 18:01 Category: System Views: 3614 Comments
Tutorial quote: Dar is a shell command that makes backup of a directory tree and files. Its features include splitting archives over several files, CDs, ZIPs, or floppies, compression, full or differential backups, strong encryption, proper saving and restoration of hard links and extended attributes, remote backup using pipes and external command (such as ssh), and rearrangement of the “slices” of an existing archive. It can now run commands between slices, encrypt archives, and quickly retrieve individual files from differential and full backups. Dar also has external GUI like kdar for Linux,thanks to the well documented API.
OSX

Unix FAQ (OS X)

Post date: October 22, 2006, 02:10 Category: System Views: 6194 Comments
Tutorial quote: Answers to frequently asked questions about using Unix-level commands on OS X. Serves as a relatively gentle introduction to the command-line interface for novices.
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