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Search results for Talking clock, written in bash using common utilities

Unix+clones

A quick guide to writing scripts using the bash shell

Post date: December 23, 2007, 20:12 Category: Programming Views: 6885 Comments
Tutorial quote: This quick bash scripting guide will have you writing scripts in no time.
Linux

Configure Multiple Network Profiles on Linux

Post date: April 13, 2005, 02:04 Category: Network Views: 2597 Comments
Tutorial quote: Mobile Linux users face some interesting (OK, vexing) challenges when they want to plug into different networks. Any Linux system will easily support all manner of networking profiles--dialup, ISDN, Ethernet, wireless--the tricky bit is configuration. Manually re-configuring a PC for every connection is low on most users' lists of "fun things to do." You can be an ace scripting guru and fiddle up something yourself, or you can find a nice ready-made utility to do the work for you. Unfortunately, I have not found a universal utility to do this. However, there are a lot of utilities specific to various distributions, and an assortment of other utilities.
Debian

Wireless networking using the ndiswrapper module

Post date: June 4, 2006, 17:06 Category: Network Views: 5419 Comments
Tutorial quote: Getting wireless networking working with the ndiswrapper driver is fairly straightfoward if your card has an associated Windows driver. Here we'll look at getting wireless networking working for a Dell Inspiron 1300, you should be able to follow the recipe for most other wireless networking cards which are supported ndiswrapper.

ndiswrapper is a collection of utilities which essentially allows you to load and run a network card driver written for Microsoft Windows upon your Linux kernel. This means that a card which isn't supported natively may be used indirectly.
Unix+clones

CLI Magic: OpenSSH + Bash

Post date: January 25, 2006, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 2974 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a system administrator, I have used OpenSSH's piping abilities more times than I can remember. The typical ssh call gets me access to systems for administration with a proven identity, but ssh is capable of so much more. In combination with bash's subshell invocation, OpenSSH can distribute the heavy work, reduce trace interference on a system under test, and make other "impossible" tasks possible. I've even used it to make Microsoft Windows remote administration easier.

In the examples below, I have tried to avoid GNU-specific idioms for tools which have non-GNU counterparts. This practice improves portability of shell scripts in heterogeneous environments.
Debian

Speedup DNS requests with a local cache

Post date: April 26, 2006, 09:04 Category: Network Views: 2755 Comments
Tutorial quote: One common server bottleneck is DNS lookups. Many common server tasks such as from looking up hostnames to write Apache logfiles and processing incoming mail require the use of DNS queries. If you're running a high-traffic system it might be useful to cache previous lookups.
Unix+clones

Emulating an OS with qemu

Post date: May 22, 2005, 08:05 Category: Emulation Views: 4344 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you want to emulate a PC with a complete operating system on your computer, the most heard answer would be VMWare. Sure, for Linux, there is wine, but that package is targeted to handle only window$ and not all programs are supported. No, I'm talking about simulating a complete OS on a virtual PC with virtual hardware.

Although VMware does an almost perfect job at it, it isn't free software. Time to see what the Open Source community has to offer. That's when I stumbled upon qemu. Let's have a look at the possibilities.
Linux

Tuning up your IDE hard disks using hdparm

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 3111 Comments
Tutorial quote: hdparm is a tool for altering various parameters associated with IDE drives (Not SCSI). This involves things like the block prefetch, the DMA/PIO modes,
and a number of other things.

I'm writing this mini-how-to to help people get more from their system. People often complain that Linux is a bit slow for them (which it can be) I haven't seen such a post recently, but I know on TechIMO at least we always used to be talking people through using hdparm.
Linux

Organizing Your Desktop Communications

Post date: April 13, 2005, 02:04 Category: Software Views: 2416 Comments
Tutorial quote: Today we'll look at two great utilities: Tuxcards, the ultimate digital notebook and organizer of zillions of tiny bits of information, and how to use SpamAssassin with KMail without having to run your own mailserver.
Unix+clones

DNS Common Abuses

Post date: April 17, 2005, 09:04 Category: Security Views: 2417 Comments
Tutorial quote: In paper I have present several features of DNS to make the reader familiar with the basics of the Domain Name System. I have also covered several well known and wide spread attacks that are used to exploit DNS. These attacks are by no means theoretical. In truth they grow more and more common as attackers become more sophisticated. The suggested defense methods outlined at the end of each section cover only the basic recommendations that can be used to thwart attackers.
Unix+clones

Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync

Post date: February 1, 2006, 00:02 Category: Software Views: 3052 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
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