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Search results for The Perfect Desktop - Part 2: Mandriva Free 2007

OpenSUSE

Google Desktop Gadgets in openSUSE

Post date: July 29, 2008, 23:07 Category: Desktop Views: 4032 Comments
Tutorial quote: Google Gadgets for Linux is a free opensource (licensed under Apache License) platform for running desktop gadgets under Linux, catering to the unique needs of Linux users.

Find how to install configure and use Google Gadgets in openSUSE
Debian

Restricting Users To SFTP Plus Setting Up Chrooted SSH/SFTP (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: September 6, 2011, 07:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 6443 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to give users chrooted SSH and/or chrooted SFTP access on Debian Squeeze. With this setup, you can give your users shell access without having to fear that they can see your whole system. Your users will be jailed in a specific directory which they will not be able to break out of. I will also show how to restrict users to SFTP so that they cannot use SSH (this part is independent from the chroot part of this tutorial).
OpenSUSE

Deluge - free opensource Torrent Client for openSUSE

Post date: September 1, 2008, 21:09 Category: Network Views: 4429 Comments
Tutorial quote: Deluge is a full-featured free opensource BitTorrent client for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows. It uses libtorrent in it’s backend and PyGTK for it’s user interface. Deluge was created with the intention of being lightweight and unobtrusive. Deluge features a rich plugin collection; in fact, most of Deluge’s functionality is available in the form of plugins. Deluge is not designed for any one specific desktop environment and will work just fine in GNOME, KDE, XFCE and others.
Linux

WiFi PDA Meets Linux--Part 3

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Software Views: 3085 Comments
Tutorial quote: Did you know that your new WiFi-equipped iPAQ can be used as a VoIP communicator? How about your Linux notebook? The program that makes it possible is called Skype and it lets you call other Skype users over the Internet for free. You can also call regular phone numbers for very competitive per-minute rates. As it turns out, Skype is available for both platforms and Windows, too. Although it's not an Open Source solution, it is freely available and fits nicely into our WiFi-PDA-meets-Linux bag of tools.

Join me now to discover how you can use the program on the iPAQ and a Linux notebook.
Linux

How To Set Up VMware Tools On Various Linux Distributions

Post date: October 2, 2007, 07:10 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 8781 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explains how to set up the VMware Tools in the following guest operating systems: Ubuntu 7.04, Fedora 7, PCLinuxOS 2007 and Debian Etch. Installing VMware Tools in your guest operating systems will help maximize performance, provide mouse synchronization and copy & paste functionality. This article also shows a way of making VMware Tools start automatically when you start a guest operating system.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 3346 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
CentOS

Installing Beryl On A CentOS 5.0 Desktop

Post date: July 22, 2007, 23:07 Category: Desktop Views: 6126 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can install and use Beryl on a CentOS 5.0 desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card). With Beryl, you can make your desktop use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube.
Ubuntu

Enabling Compiz Fusion On An Ubuntu 11.04 Desktop (With The Unity Desktop)

Post date: July 3, 2011, 18:07 Category: Desktop Views: 3510 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on an Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) desktop with the Unity interface (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card which I assume it has because otherwise Unity wouldn't start, and GNOME would be used instead). With Compiz Fusion you can use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube on your desktop.
Linux

Rip DVDs in Linux the (Semi-)Easy Way

Post date: December 8, 2007, 14:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 4070 Comments
Tutorial quote: With its hacker-friendly aesthetic and open source mentality, you'd think a Linux desktop would be the best place to assert your digital rights—you know, make backup copies of your DVDs, convert them for iPods, that kind of thing.

And you'd be half right. There are plenty of programs that let you take control of your video discs, but they're only useful if you can make it through a maze of configuration menus, command line options, choices about bit rates and codecs, and the occasional confusing message about a missing library.

I've tried out a good number of DVD ripping and conversion programs, and I've made peace with one method, and one program, that gets the job done more often than not. It's not exactly one-click, but once your system is set up, you can drop in DVDs and back them up or convert them with relative ease.

Note on system differences: I set up my ripping/burning system on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 running a brand-new installation of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). As with so many things Linux, packages and commands may vary based on your system. But for the most part, the tools I use in this walkthrough work across distributions and on both major desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 4331 Comments
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
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