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Linux

Setting the SUID/SGID bits

Post date: June 27, 2009, 09:06 Category: Security Views: 4466 Comments
Tutorial quote: SetUID bit, the executable which has the SUID set runs with the ownership of the program owner. That is, if you own an executable, and another person issues the executable, then it runs with your permission and not his. The default is that a program runs with the ownership of the person executing the binary.
RedHat

My First Linux Server, Part 1

Post date: April 14, 2005, 22:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4472 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many small businesses are turning to Linux as way to swim against the tide of rising software costs. Are you thinking about diving into Linux for your small business? From the outside, Linux can appear to be a deep ocean of strange jargon in unchartered waters. Who has the time to wade through all that to save a few clams? With Linux, it's not a sink or swim proposition.

Linux is now a lot simpler than you may think. We can provide you with the easiest, simplest, no-problem process for installing Linux on a PC. After going through this simple installation process, you will have a basic machine that you can configure into any kind of server, workstation, or office desktop. Future articles in this My First Linux Server series will help you build productive, Linux-based servers and small office workstations.

The best choices for your first Linux machine are probably the popular Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux, primarily because both are easy to install and configure. Additionally, these companies are sound choices for the home office or small business. Both vendors have specialized in Linux for many years and offer full corporate product lines supporting your expansion.
Unix+clones

Create your own init.d scripts

Post date: November 11, 2007, 05:11 Category: System Views: 7636 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have a Linux executable that you would like to run as a daemon? Making your own init.d scripts can be a bit tricky, but I can help you out.

The directory /etc/init.d/ is a location on a Linux file system that contains scripts for changing init states.

For details on Linux run levels look here.

The run levels that are most important to us are 2, 3 and 5.

VERY basic sample init.d script (Replace italics respectively):
Fedora

Watching Your Power Consumption With Powertop On Fedora 7

Post date: October 1, 2007, 10:10 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2977 Comments
Tutorial quote: Powertop is a command-line tool released by Intel that shows you the power consumption of the applications running on your system. It works best on notebooks with Intel mobile processors and can help you find out the programs that put a strain on your notebook battery. It requires kernel 2.6.21 or newer with tickless idle enabled (CONFIG_NO_HZ) (which is currently available for 32-bit kernels only). Fedora 7 comes with a 2.6.21 kernel by default, so we can use Powertop on it.
Unix+clones

Get Vista and Samba to work

Post date: December 16, 2006, 16:12 Category: Network Views: 9920 Comments
Tutorial quote: Early adopters of Microsoft’s new Vista operating system may notice that it will not connect to Samba share folders out of the box. This will be a bit of a pain for many enterprise customers. The technical reason is because Microsoft Vista’s default security policy is to only use NTLMv2 authentication. According to a Google search Samba doesn’t support this yet.

To get Vista to work with Samba follow the simple instructions below.
Gentoo

Hardened Gentoo PaX Quickstart

Post date: May 21, 2005, 21:05 Category: Security Views: 3563 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial explains how to setup PaX enabled kernel and take advantage of it.
Ubuntu

Setting up an Ubuntu media server

Post date: April 23, 2008, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 14706 Comments
Tutorial quote: In today's tip I'm going to run through how to setup an Ubuntu media server. First of all, what is Ubuntu. Wikipedia says:

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, and servers. It has consistently been rated among the most popular of the many GNU/Linux distributions. Ubuntu's goals include providing an up-to-date yet stable operating system for the average user and having a strong focus on usability and ease of installation.

It is very much like apache, which I showed you how to setup in my article on how to make your computer into a local server, in that it is commonly used as a server software. Now then, what is a media server?

To refer to Wikipedia again, a media server is

A media server is a computer appliance, ranging from an enterprise class machine providing video on demand, to, more commonly, a small home computer storing various digital media.

Basically, it's just like a local server which stores and shares solely media instead of other types of files. I'll leave the uses of one to your imagination. Let's on with setting it up.
Gentoo

PureFTPD with MySQL Auth + MyPhpAdmin

Post date: June 11, 2005, 08:06 Category: Network Views: 4252 Comments
Tutorial quote: Simple guide on how to setup Pure-FTPD on Gentoo with MySQL authorization.
Unix+clones

How to setup your keyboard's extra keys in X11

Post date: December 29, 2005, 06:12 Category: Desktop Views: 2876 Comments
Tutorial quote: Well, it's the day after christmas and like me, you got this new keyboard with all those sweet little buttons on top. How to configure that you may ask? Let's explore this together
Fedora

Multimedia Support in Fedora 10

Post date: December 5, 2008, 12:12 Category: Multimedia Views: 3274 Comments
Tutorial quote: Why doesn’t Fedora support MP3 ‘out of the box’?
Fedora cannot include support for MP3 or DVD video playback or recording. MP3 formats are patented, and the patent holders have not provided the necessary licenses. Fedora also excludes other multimedia software due to patent, copyright, or license restrictions, such as Adobe Flash Player and RealNetworks RealPlayer.

That doesn’t mean you can’t play .mp3 files in Fedora, it just takes a bit of work (not much).
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