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Search results for Transform Linux into a Talking Companion

Ubuntu

Transform Linux into a Talking Companion

Post date: November 24, 2007, 22:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4292 Comments
Tutorial quote: Text-to-speech is really convenient, especially when you are lazy like me. Festival enables us to achieve a TTS system with limitless possibilities thanks to our Linux bash shell. I will show you some ways that we can use Festival as an enabler to our laziness and also produce some really cool and useful effects when coupling this technology with common things like PHP, cron, dnotify, or login scripts.
Linux

Talking clock, written in bash using common utilities

Post date: October 20, 2006, 19:10 Category: Programming Views: 3867 Comments
Tutorial quote: Build your own talking clock, using Bash and some common *nix utilities like sox. Articluates the time at random once an hour and hour and with a random pitch.
Includes very basic short scripts to get you going on basic bash coding and then puts it all together to produce the finished item.
Takes time out to explain as much as possible to a large audience.
Unix+clones

Emulating an OS with qemu

Post date: May 22, 2005, 08:05 Category: Emulation Views: 4288 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you want to emulate a PC with a complete operating system on your computer, the most heard answer would be VMWare. Sure, for Linux, there is wine, but that package is targeted to handle only window$ and not all programs are supported. No, I'm talking about simulating a complete OS on a virtual PC with virtual hardware.

Although VMware does an almost perfect job at it, it isn't free software. Time to see what the Open Source community has to offer. That's when I stumbled upon qemu. Let's have a look at the possibilities.
Linux

Tuning up your IDE hard disks using hdparm

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 3056 Comments
Tutorial quote: hdparm is a tool for altering various parameters associated with IDE drives (Not SCSI). This involves things like the block prefetch, the DMA/PIO modes,
and a number of other things.

I'm writing this mini-how-to to help people get more from their system. People often complain that Linux is a bit slow for them (which it can be) I haven't seen such a post recently, but I know on TechIMO at least we always used to be talking people through using hdparm.
Linux

Tweakin' your Bash Prompt

Post date: January 6, 2007, 22:01 Category: System Views: 4194 Comments
Tutorial quote: A friendly companion to the Bash-Prompt HOWTO, including a new trick to make the prompt change color dynamically based on your log-in. In the process, the overview could be handy in doing other Bash prompt tricks.
Unix+clones

Version control for non-programmers with Subversion

Post date: June 9, 2005, 04:06 Category: Software Views: 2913 Comments
Tutorial quote: Imagine a utility that lets you make an annotated backup of any of your project files with the click of a mouse or a single command. It would let you review the history of your backups and recover any version you wished. And it would integrate with your file browser and would keep track of files that have changed since your last backup. The utility exists -- Subversion, and its companion program TortoiseSVN, can help you safely manage your files as you work with them.
OpenSUSE

Encrypt-Decrypt files using mcrypt on OpenSuse

Post date: January 27, 2009, 07:01 Category: Security Views: 3333 Comments
Tutorial quote: MCrypt is a replacement for the old crypt() package and crypt(1) command, with extensions. It allows developers to use a wide range of encryption functions, without making drastic changes to their code. It allows users to encrypt files or data streams without having to be cryptographers. Above all, it allows you to have some really neat code on your machine. :)

The companion to MCrypt is Libmcrypt, which contains the actual encryption functions themselves, and provides a standardized mechanism for accessing them.
SuSe

OpenSUSE 10.1 Installation Walkthrough with Screenshots

Post date: October 11, 2006, 16:10 Category: Installing Views: 8391 Comments
Tutorial quote: SUSE (formerly SuSE) is the leading distribution of Linux in Europe. SUSE Linux sets new standards for quality and ease of use, offering comprehensive packages of Linux-based applications. It is available in English, German, French, and Italian. The readers of Linux Journal voted SuSE Linux the Reader’s Choice for Best Distribution (1/99).
Linux

Linux stateful firewall design

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 2386 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows you how to use netfilter to set up a powerful Linux stateful firewall. All you need is an existing Linux system that's currently using a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel. A laptop, workstation, router or server with at a Linux 2.4.x or 2.6.x kernel will do. You should be reasonably familiar with standard network terminology like IP addresses, source and destination port numbers, TCP, UDP and ICMP, etc. By the end of the tutorial, you'll understand how Linux stateful firewalls are put together and you'll have several example configurations to use in your own projects.
RedHat

My First Linux Server, Part 1

Post date: April 14, 2005, 22:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4414 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many small businesses are turning to Linux as way to swim against the tide of rising software costs. Are you thinking about diving into Linux for your small business? From the outside, Linux can appear to be a deep ocean of strange jargon in unchartered waters. Who has the time to wade through all that to save a few clams? With Linux, it's not a sink or swim proposition.

Linux is now a lot simpler than you may think. We can provide you with the easiest, simplest, no-problem process for installing Linux on a PC. After going through this simple installation process, you will have a basic machine that you can configure into any kind of server, workstation, or office desktop. Future articles in this My First Linux Server series will help you build productive, Linux-based servers and small office workstations.

The best choices for your first Linux machine are probably the popular Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux, primarily because both are easy to install and configure. Additionally, these companies are sound choices for the home office or small business. Both vendors have specialized in Linux for many years and offer full corporate product lines supporting your expansion.
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