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Debian

Firebird database Configuration

Post date: May 5, 2006, 17:05 Category: Installing Views: 2781 Comments
Tutorial quote: Firebird is a relational database offering many ANSI SQL-99 features that runs on Linux, Windows, and a variety of Unix platforms. Firebird offers excellent concurrency, high performance, and powerful language support for stored procedures and triggers. It has been used in production systems, under a variety of names since 1981.

Firebird is a commercially independent project of C and C++ programmers, technical advisors and supporters developing and enhancing a multi-platform relational database management system based on the source code released by Inprise Corp (now known as Borland Software Corp) under the InterBase Public License v.1.0 on 25 July, 2000.
Ubuntu

Flip - Convert text file line endings between Unix and DOS formats

Post date: March 2, 2009, 07:03 Category: System Views: 3499 Comments
Tutorial quote: This program converts line endings of text files between MS-DOS and **IX formats. It detects binary files in a nearly foolproof way and leaves them alone unless you override this. It will also leave files alone that are already in the right format and preserves file timestamps.User interrupts are handled gracefully and no garbage or corrupted files left behind. ‘flip’ does not convert files to a different character set, and it can not handle Apple Macintosh line endings (CR only). For that (and more), you can use the ‘recode’ program (package ‘recode’).

Debian

How to Install Latest Wine in debian Etch

Post date: December 22, 2008, 07:12 Category: Software Views: 3731 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wine makes it possible to run Windows programs alongside any Unix-like operating system,particularly Linux. At its heart, Wine is an implementation of the Windows Application
Programing Interface (API) library, acting as a bridge between the Windows program and Linux.Think of Wine as a compatibility layer, when a Windows program tries to perform a function that Linux doesn’t normally understand, Wine will translate that program’s instruction into one supported by the system. For example, if a program asks the system to create a Windows pushbutton or text-edit field, Wine will convert that instruction into its Linux equivalent in the form of a command to the window manager using the standard X11 protocol.
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: December 7, 2007, 06:12 Category: Emulation Views: 6224 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: April 3, 2006, 06:04 Category: System Views: 4364 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
Unix+clones

Using the GNU Privacy Guard

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Software Views: 3075 Comments
Tutorial quote: Tonight we will investigate the gnupg utility (version 1.07). I will be running it on an OpenBSD 3.2 system but, as usual, any unix-like system should not display any significant differences. I will assume that GPG is already installed.

The GNU Privacy Guard can be regarded as a complete replacement for the popular PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) software. The difference between the two is that GnuPG does not have any licensing restrictions and it also runs on more platforms. They are both open source products. Although owned by a commercial entity, a freeware version of PGP is available (although only for Windows and Macintosh).

In a nutshell, what all this software does is allow two parties to communicate securely. This implies the following:
- the message has arrived at its destination unaltered
- the message can only be read by its intended recipient
- the authenticity of the sender has been verified by the recipient
Linux

NFS over CIPE-VPN tunnels

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Network Views: 3541 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Network File System (NFS) is a standard protocol for sharing file services with Linux and Unix computers. It is a distributed file system that enables local access to remote disks and file systems and is based on the client\server architecture. Although easy to configure, it is typically used only to transfer data over an intranet or LAN because of its transparency and security potholes when exposed to the risks of the Internet. However, it still can be employed -- without compromising security -- to share files over the Internet by configuring it to run on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. This article will show you how to set up NFS to run over a CIPE-VPN connection between two Linux systems.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 3493 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
Debian

ACL(Access Control List) Configuration

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 3685 Comments
Tutorial quote: Access Control Lists (ACLs) provide a much more flexible way of specifying permissions on a file or other object than the standard Unix user/group/owner system. Windows NT and above, when running on an NTFS partition, use ACLs to specify permissions on files and directories. This document attempts to show how you can enable ACL support on your Linux box and use Samba to provide an SMB file server for use by machines in a Windows 2000 domain.

ACLs are best stored in the actual file system itself. To that end, there are patches available for ext2 and ext3 that enable ACL support using Extended Attributes (EAs). SGI's XFS also has ACL support built in, but XFS is not currently covered in this document.
Linux

The Linux /proc Filesystem as a Programmers' Tool

Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: Programming Views: 4143 Comments
Tutorial quote: My entry into systems programming was guided by my desire to understand further the operating systems I was working with daily as a contract UNIX and, later, Linux system administrator. The result of this was ifchk, a packet sniffer detector I wrote in C and released in June of 2003. ifchk initially was written under IRIX and then ported to Linux, mostly under the 2.4 kernel. The current ifchk revision, beta 4, recently was released and beta 5 is on the way.

My work on ifchk has allowed me to examine programmatically several areas of operating system functionality. Examples include the Linux netlink(7) and rtnetlink(7) facilities, device control--that is, network interfaces--via ioctl(2), signals and proc, the process filesystem. Proc and its ability to display a wide array of data concerning the runtime state of a system are the focus of our discussion here.
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