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Linux

How To Set Up Linux As A Dial-In Server

Post date: January 21, 2007, 20:01 Category: Network Views: 4533 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to attach modems to a Linux box and allow it to receive calls to connect users to the network. It is like being your own ISP (Internet Service Provider). If your Linux box is connected to the Internet, then the users will also be connected to the Internet. Your Linux box becomes a router. This is also known as RAS (Remote Access Services) in the Microsoft world. In the Linux world it is called PPP (Point to Point Protocol).
OpenSUSE

Webmin installation and configuration on OpenSuSe

Post date: November 17, 2008, 11:11 Category: Installing Views: 4840 Comments
Tutorial quote: Webmin, developed by Jamie Cameron, acts as a comprehensive interface to the underlying applications on servers, including support for configuring applications like ftp, ssh, mail, Web, databases and more. Differing from other control panels, the core Webmin interface is intended for system administrators with root access to their servers, and includes a user-based package to enable your users (or clients) to access their own domains, email, and more, within a limited scope. Webmin supports running under SSL.
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 9.04

Post date: July 27, 2009, 10:07 Category: Desktop Views: 2728 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope).
Ubuntu

Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 7.10

Post date: March 11, 2008, 10:03 Category: Desktop Views: 3313 Comments
Tutorial quote: BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).
OpenSUSE

Clive - Download videos from YouTube & other video sharing websites

Post date: August 15, 2008, 22:08 Category: Multimedia Views: 3931 Comments
Tutorial quote: clive is an open source command line tool to extract videos and to bypass the need to use Adobe Flash in order to view user-generated content available on video-sharing websites. Clive supports Youtube, GoogleVideo, Dailymotion, metacafe, Guba, Sevenload, Myvideo. Clive converts the downloaded Flash Video into a MP4 file avoiding the need of having a Flash Video Player.
Debian

Password-Protect Directories With mod_auth_mysql On Apache2 (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: November 15, 2011, 10:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 32379 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to password-protect web directories (with users from a MySQL database) with mod_auth_mysql on Apache2 on a Debian Squeeze server. It is an alternative to the plain-text password files provided by mod_auth and allows you to use normal SQL syntax to create/modify delete users. You can also configure mod_auth_mysql to authenticate against an existing MySQL user table.
Debian

Giving users a home directory automatically

Post date: June 16, 2006, 21:06 Category: System Views: 3496 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you are using LDAP or NIS to manage users you might discover users having problems because they don't have a home directory on each machine they can connect to. Thankfully there is a simple solution for creating home directories upon demand for users.

The Pluggable Authentication Modules library, or PAM, is a collection of shared libraries which control how users login to systems. There are a number of modules installed which can be used to restrict user access to systems in different ways. There are also several utility modules which can be used to customise login behaviour.
Linux

DOS Emulation Under Linux

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: Emulation Views: 3737 Comments
Tutorial quote: Whether you need to run some legacy corporate application, or just want to play some of those old classic DOS games, it's easy to get going.

I've done this on a Slackware 9.1 Linux system with a 2.4.22 kernel, running KDE 3.1.4. The process should be very similar for most reasonably recent Linux distros.
Linux

How to install Linux on Windows using VirtualBox

Post date: August 12, 2008, 14:08 Category: Installing Views: 3709 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how to install Linux and specifically Ubuntu Linux on Windows XP using SUN's VirtualBox. VirtualBox creates a virtual hard drive in which you can install another guest Operating System (Ubuntu Linux) which you can run along with your host Operating System (Windows XP). This way you can try Linux without being afraid of losing your Windows files.
RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 8460 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
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