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Linux

Removing A User

Post date: April 8, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 3925 Comments
Tutorial quote: Employee turnover in most organizations runs high. So unless you run a small shop with a stable user base, you need to learn how to clean up after an employee leaves. Too many so-called system administrators do not understand the stakes involved when they manage users. Disgruntled former employees can often cause significant trouble for a company by gaining access to the network.

To remove a user, you need to learn to manage all of his or her files, mailboxes, mail aliases, print jobs, recurring –(automatic) personal processes such as the backing up of data or remote syncing of directories, and other references to the user. It is a good idea at first to disable the account in /etc/passwd, after which you can search for the user's files and other references. Once all traces of the user have been cleaned up, you can remove the user completely—but if you remove the entry from /etc/passwd while these other references exist, you have a harder time referring to them .

When you remove a user, it's a good idea to follow a pre-determined course of action so you don't forget any important steps; it may even be a good idea to make a checklist so that you have a routine. Following, you will find several items requiring attention.
Linux

Back Up Linux And Windows Systems With BackupPC

Post date: January 28, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 4430 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up Linux and Windows systems with BackupPC. BackupPC acts as a server and is installed on a Linux system, and from there it can connect to all Linux and Windows systems in your local network to back them up and restore them without interfering with the user's work on that system. On the clients minimal to no configuration is needed. BackupPC supports full and incremental backups, and it comes with a neat web frontend for the administrator and normal user so that backups and recoveries can be managed through a web browser. It should be noted, however, that BackupPC does file-based backups, not bit-wise backups like Ghost4Linux, for example, so it is not made for disk/partition imaging.
Linux

Penguin Pete's X Window Manager and Desktop Environment Guide

Post date: January 6, 2007, 22:01 Category: Desktop Views: 2396 Comments
Tutorial quote: A tour of the desktops you will encounter on 99% of the Linux distributions out there. Each with screen shots, a review, and links. Written to help the new Linux user get familiar with the Linux desktop scene and help them decide which one is right for them.
Unix+clones

Remote backup using ssh, tar and cron

Post date: April 13, 2005, 01:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2841 Comments
Tutorial quote: Are you looking for a solution to backup your data to a remote location? While a solid backup solution such as Arkeia or TSM from IBM are nice from an enterprise point of view, simpler solutions are available from a home user's perspective. I will walk you through on you how you can backup your data to a remote server, using the default tools available on all linux systems. In a nutshell, we will use ssh capabilities to allow a cron job to transfer a tarball from you local machine to a remote machine.

For the purpose of this tutorial, the local machine will be called “localmachine” (running slackware) and the remote server will be called “remoteserver” (slackware as well). The user will be joe (me). You will have to substitute those 3 with your own machines names and user.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2696 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
Debian

PHP-FPM/Nginx Security In Shared Hosting Environments (Debian/Ubuntu)

Post date: September 25, 2011, 16:09 Category: Security Views: 4984 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you want to use nginx and PHP-FPM for shared hosting environments, you should make up your mind about security. In Apache/PHP environments, you can use suExec and/or suPHP to make PHP execute under individual user accounts instead of a system user like www-data. There's no such thing for PHP-FPM, but fortunately PHP-FPM allows us to set up a "pool" for each web site that makes PHP scripts execute as the user/group defined in that pool. This gives you all the benefits of suPHP, and in addition to that you don't have any FTP or SCP transfer problems because PHP scripts don't need to be owned by a specific user/group to be executed as the user/group defined in the pool.
Unix+clones

Setup the SSH server to use keys for authentication

Post date: November 16, 2005, 20:11 Category: Network Views: 3117 Comments
Tutorial quote: The user creates a keypair, which consists of a private key, that can be protected with a passphrase, and a public key. The public key is transfered to the server and the private key is kept in our workstation. We assume that the user has accounts in both the server machine and his workstation. Everytime he tries to connect to the server, the keys are validated and the user is granted access.
Ubuntu

The Perfect SpamSnake - Ubuntu Jeos 9.10

Post date: April 22, 2010, 12:04 Category: Installing Views: 2531 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Jeos based server as a spamfilter in gateway mode. In the end, you will have a SpamSnake gateway which will relay clean emails to your MTA. You will also be able to view your incoming queue, train your SpamSnake and carry out a few more advanced operations via MailWatch.
Ubuntu

The Perfect SpamSnake - Ubuntu 8.04 LTS

Post date: May 4, 2008, 11:05 Category: Installing Views: 2642 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Hardy Heron (8.04 LTS) based server as a spamfilter in gateway mode. In the end, you will have a SpamSnake Gateway which will relay clean emails to your MTA. You will also be able to view your incoming queue, train your SpamSnake and carry out a few more advanced operations via MailWatch.
Linux

How to Configure Apache as a Forward / Reverse Proxy

Post date: January 24, 2010, 06:01 Category: Network Views: 4725 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache can be configured in both a forward and reverse proxy (also known as gateway) mode.
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