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FreeBSD

Build your own gateway firewall

Post date: April 11, 2006, 21:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5859 Comments
Tutorial quote: Learn how to build your own gateway firewall using FreeBSD and old PC parts. The firewall will consist of the PF firewall, Snort IDS, various IPS applications, Squid proxy, and some intuitive web interfaces for auditing. The cost of this project should be between free and $200 depending on your resourcefulness. I built mine for free using spare parts that were stockpiled in personal storage and parts that the USMC was throwing away, but you can build one from used and/or new parts for dirt cheap.
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)

Post date: June 10, 2007, 22:06 Category: Installing Views: 5185 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.0 system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.6 (x86_64)

Post date: May 24, 2011, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 3364 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.6 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

Post date: December 15, 2009, 12:12 Category: Installing Views: 4946 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.4 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.
Unix+clones

Command your network with Kaboodle

Post date: June 28, 2005, 09:06 Category: Network Views: 3980 Comments
Tutorial quote: Quite often setting up a local network is much easier than managing it. Even technically challenged users can figure out how to connect a couple of computers and a printer. However, tasks like maintenance, troubleshooting, and remote secure connections require more than just "which-cable-goes-where" knowledge. You need something like Kaboodle, a nifty tool that can help you to manage your local network like a pro.

Kaboodle allows you to visualize your local network, control computers on it via VNC, and connect to other Kaboodle-enabled networks. Kaboodle was developed for Windows, but according to its Web site, it will happily run under Wine on Linux and FreeBSD.
PC-BSD

The Perfect Desktop - PC-BSD 1.5

Post date: March 20, 2008, 12:03 Category: Desktop Views: 9879 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up PC-BSD v1.5. This release is based upon FreeBSD 6.3 and uses KDE 3.5.8 as default desktop environment. Taken from the PC-BSD page: PC-BSD is a complete desktop operating system, which has been designed with the "casual" computer user in mind. It offers the stability and security that only a BSD-based operating system can bring, while as the same time providing a comfortable user experience, allowing you to get the most out of your computing time. With PC-BSD you can spend less time working to fix viruses or spyware and instead have the computer work for you.
Debian

How To Install VMware Server On Debian Sarge

Post date: November 1, 2006, 18:11 Category: Installing Views: 3707 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.1) on a Debian Sarge system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. In this article we use Debian Sarge (3.1) as the host operating system.
Ubuntu

Installing Xen On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

Post date: June 30, 2007, 00:06 Category: Installing Views: 3829 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files or compilation are needed. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 8.10 Server

Post date: March 10, 2009, 12:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5489 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 8.10 KVM server.
Ubuntu

Installing KVM Guests With virt-install On Ubuntu 10.10 Server

Post date: November 30, 2010, 12:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3507 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unlike virt-manager, virt-install is a command line tool that allows you to create KVM guests on a headless server. You may ask yourself: "But I can use vmbuilder to do this, why do I need virt-install?" The difference between virt-install and vmbuilder is that vmbuilder is for creating Ubuntu-based guests, whereas virt-install lets you install all kinds of operating systems (e.g. Linux, Windows, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD) and distributions in a guest, just like virt-manager. This article shows how you can use it on an Ubuntu 10.10 KVM server.
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