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Search results for Using a jail as a virtual machine

FreeBSD

Using a jail as a virtual machine

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: System Views: 3609 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article shows you how I created a jail for the OSW website. It runs in a jail on the same system as this website. I originally did this install back in November 2003 and the notes from that session form the basis of this article. I have need to recreate the jail now as we recently had an HDD failure.

A jail is useful for many purposes. In my case, I wanted to give the OSW project a place to run their websites, mailing lists, etc, but at the same time keep them isolated from the rest of the machine. In short, it gives them a virtual machine, and it gives me peace of mind knowing that I have less to worry about with respect to the rest of the machine.
CentOS

Settings up a SFTP Only Chroot Jail

Post date: December 13, 2007, 22:12 Category: Security Views: 7799 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to set up a chroot jail (SFTP only) to allow your users to ONLY use sftp (no ssh/bash/…), and keep them stuck inside their own home directory. This tutorial is known to work on many other distributions as well as CentOS.
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)

Post date: November 9, 2008, 12:11 Category: Installing Views: 4870 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 2656 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.3 (x86_64)

Post date: May 17, 2009, 13:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4651 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.3 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

Virtualization With Xen On Debian Lenny (AMD64)

Post date: February 8, 2009, 13:02 Category: Installing Views: 3205 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a Debian Lenny (5.0) system (AMD64). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

Paravirtualization With Xen 4.0 On Debian Squeeze (AMD64)

Post date: March 31, 2011, 09:03 Category: Installing Views: 2892 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 4.0 on a Debian Squeeze (6.0) system (AMD64) and create paravirtualized guests. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
CentOS

Chroot jail SFTP only OpenSSH 5.x

Post date: May 5, 2008, 00:05 Category: Security Views: 9710 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to set up a chroot jail (SFTP only) to allow your users to ONLY use sftp (no ssh/bash/), and keep them stuck inside their own home directory. This tutorial is known to work on many other distributions as well as CentOS.
This tutorial is for the 4.9-5.x updates of OpenSSH
Debian

Virtualization With Xen 3.3.1 On Debian Etch

Post date: February 12, 2009, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 2578 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 3.3.1 on a Debian Etch (4.0) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware.
Linux

More speed for virtual machine

Post date: April 1, 2008, 08:04 Category: Emulation Views: 5757 Comments
Tutorial quote: How to improve virtual machine performances in 3D acceleration (OpenGL) using VMGL with X forwarding on VMware Server. Only for GNU/Linux
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink