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Search results for Using multiple network cards in XEN

Debian

Using multiple network cards in XEN

Post date: December 10, 2006, 09:12 Category: Emulation Views: 7481 Comments
Tutorial quote: Xen is great. But installing more than one network card became a pain when I tried it the first time. There are some documents describing the principle but I was unable to find a real life example somewhere else. So this is a summary about how it works here now.
Unix+clones

Squeeze Your Gigabit NIC for Top Performance

Post date: June 25, 2005, 01:06 Category: Optimizing Views: 4224 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many new workstations and servers are coming with integrated gigabit network cards, but quite a few people soon discover that they can't transfer data much faster than they did with 100 Mb/s network cards. Multiple factors can affect your ability to transfer at higher speeds, and most of them revolve around operating system settings. In this article we will discuss the necessary steps to make your new gigabit-enabled server obtain close to gigabit speeds in Linux, FreeBSD, and Windows.
Linux

Building a Virtual Cluster with Xen

Post date: September 28, 2006, 04:09 Category: Emulation Views: 7496 Comments
Tutorial quote: It is a common practice to have development and test servers for each production server, so that you can experiment with changes without the fear of breaking anything important, but this is usually not feasible with clusters. So how do you try that new version of your favorite program before committing it to the production cluster? A cheap and convenient possibility is to build a virtual cluster.

Thanks to the Xen virtual machine monitor, you can create a number of virtual machines, all running simultaneously in your computer, install different operating systems in them, or just different configurations, and connect them via (virtual) network cards. Xen is a terrific tool for building virtual Beowulf clusters. It can prove useful when learning or teaching about clusters or for testing new features/software without the fear of causing major damage to an existing cluster.
Linux

Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 1

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: System Views: 3690 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you heard about Xen virtualization and want to get some hands-on experience? Do you want to experiment with Linux clustering but only have a single computer to devote to the cause? If you answered yes to either of these questions, keep reading.

In this article, I briefly introduce the concepts of Xen virtualization and Linux clustering. From there, I show you how to set up multiple operating systems on a single computer using Xen and how to configure them for use with clustering. I should point out that a cluster implemented in this manner does not provide the computational power of multiple physical computers. It does, however, offer a way to prototype a cluster as well as provide a cost-effective development environment for cluster-based software. Even if you're not interested in clustering, this article gives you hands-on experience using Xen virtualization.
OpenSUSE

How to install & configure Xen Virtualization in openSUSE 11.0

Post date: July 31, 2008, 18:07 Category: System Views: 4482 Comments
Tutorial quote: Virtualization cannot be that simpler than in openSUSE 11.0. In openSUSE 11.0, Xen Virtualization ins pre-built and all it takes is a few clicks away from up and running with Virtualization in no time. Xen is a virtual machine monitor for x86 that supports execution of multiple guest operating systems with unprecedented levels of performance and resource isolation.
Debian

Managing Xen With Xen-Tools, Xen-Shell, And Argo

Post date: November 5, 2006, 21:11 Category: System Views: 4283 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide describes how to install and use xen-tools, xen-shell, and Argo on a Debian system. All three packages provide useful tools for the administration of virtual Xen machines. Xen-tools is a collection of Perl scripts that allow you to easily create, update, and delete Xen guest domains. The xen-shell provides a command-line interface to owners of Xen domains so that they can manage their Xen domains without the help of the server administrator. And with Argo, you can control Xen domains through a web interface or through a menu on the command line.
Ubuntu

How to Set up Network Bonding in Ubuntu 6.10

Post date: February 16, 2007, 22:02 Category: Network Views: 5602 Comments
Tutorial quote: Network Bonding, otherwise known as port trunking allows you to combine multiple network ports into a single group, effectively aggregating the bandwidth of multiple interfaces into a single connection. For example, you can aggregate two gigabyte ports into a two-gigabyte trunk port. Bonding is used primarily to provide network load balancing and fault tolerance.
Linux

Vodafone Mobile Connect Card Driver For Linux

Post date: November 5, 2007, 09:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 10139 Comments
Tutorial quote: Vodafone Mobile Connect Card driver for Linux is a tool that allows you to establish a connection to the Internet using 3G cards. It also allows to send and receive short messages from your computer. The cards currently supported are: Huawei E620, Huawei E220 and Option GlobeTrotter 3G+ EMEA.
Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0.3 Setup For Debian Sarge

Post date: October 22, 2006, 19:10 Category: Emulation Views: 5950 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions about how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system. It shows how to compile Xen, dom0 and domU kernels from the sources as well as how to install Xen from precompiled binaries. Creating guest domains from images is also covered by this article.
Debian

Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel

Post date: December 29, 2005, 07:12 Category: System Views: 3520 Comments
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
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