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Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 3198 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
Linux

Boot Linux Over HTTP With netboot.me

Post date: October 1, 2009, 12:10 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3997 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can boot Linux over HTTP with netboot.me. All that users need is Internet connectivity and a small program (gpxe) to boot the machine. This gpxe program provides network booting facility. netboot.me allows you to boot into the following distributions: Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu. netboot.me provides gpxe images for USB sticks, CDs, and also for floppies, i.e., you can boot from a USB sticks, a CD, or a floppy.
Debian

Nagios and Oreon (Nagios web front end) installation and Configuration

Post date: July 18, 2006, 17:07 Category: Software Views: 3998 Comments
Tutorial quote: Nagios is a host and service monitor designed to inform you of network problems before your clients, end-users or managers do. It has been designed to run under the Linux operating system, but works fine under most *NIX variants as well. The monitoring daemon runs intermittent checks on hosts and services you specify using external "plugins" which return status information to Nagios. When problems are encountered, the daemon can send notifications out to administrative contacts in a variety of different ways (email, instant message, SMS, etc.).

Solaris

Restoring a Sun system using JumpStart technology

Post date: April 13, 2005, 05:04 Category: Installing Views: 4812 Comments
Tutorial quote: If a server crash and the file systems are corrupted or totally destroyed, then the only way to recover the data is to restore from backups. If it is only user data that is corrupted, the task is in general simple, but if the system disk fails, then there is a little bit more work involved in order to to recover the system. This article explains how to backup Sun systems using ufsrestore over NFS, and how to use Sun's JumpStart technology to restore Sun servers and workstations over the network.
Ubuntu

Using iSCSI On Ubuntu 10.04 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: August 17, 2010, 11:08 Category: Installing Views: 5662 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Ubuntu 10.04. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Fedora

Using iSCSI On Fedora 10 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: May 28, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4879 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Fedora 10. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Ubuntu

Using iSCSI On Ubuntu 9.04 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: July 7, 2009, 11:07 Category: Installing Views: 5612 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Ubuntu 9.04. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Ubuntu

Intrusion Detection: Snort, Base, MySQL, and Apache2 On Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon)

Post date: November 21, 2007, 10:11 Category: Security Views: 5690 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure Snort (an intrusion detection system (IDS)) from source, BASE (Basic Analysis and Security Engine), MySQL, and Apache2 on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). Snort will assist you in monitoring your network and alert you about possible threats. Snort will output its log files to a MySQL database which BASE will use to display a graphical interface in a web browser.
Ubuntu

Get your wireless card working in Ubuntu

Post date: June 3, 2006, 11:06 Category: Network Views: 5266 Comments
Tutorial quote: Okay so you have a wireless card that shows up in ubuntu but doesnt connect to any wireless network?

The reason the card shows up but doesnt work is because ubuntu is distributed with its driver (so it can recognize it) but not with its firmware (so it can USE it) for legal reasons.

However you can take the firmware out of the windows drivers and put them into ubuntu and make the card work
Follow these steps to get your wireless card working under ubuntu dapper 6.06
Unix+clones

Keeping Your Life in Subversion

Post date: October 2, 2005, 16:10 Category: Software Views: 4132 Comments
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
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