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Linux

Install OpenWRT, Chillispot, FreeRadius Based Managed Hotspot(s) Including PayPal Payment Gateway

Post date: March 23, 2008, 14:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 7015 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have ever tried to implement one of the hotspot HowTos on this and other sites, it might have dawned on you that this is not an easy feat to accomplish. Amazingly most solutions also leave out the most important part – how to get paid by the punters using the hotspot. Some will offer prepaid solution or access tickets that need to be printed, but this will require staff being involved on the premises. And in particular, once you want to offer a professional service and not just a toy concept it gets tricky – and expensive. Just imagine all the servers you need to provide redundant and load balanced freeradius, mysql and web servers. It is generally not worth the effort and expense for just one hotspot – unless of course you are willing to accept outages, unhappy customers etc.
Ubuntu

Nginx HTTP Server + PHP5 (With fast-cgi And xcache) On Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Post date: October 10, 2007, 10:10 Category: Installing Views: 5070 Comments
Tutorial quote: Nginx HTTP Server + PHP5 (With fast-cgi And xcache) On Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

This HowTo describes the implementation of Nginx with php5 support (through FastCGI). The fast-cgi process will be initiated via spawn-fcgi. Nginx is a great replacement of Apache with very low memory footprint and contrary to Lighttpd, does not suffer from memory leak over time. You can then use all the memory left to unleash the power of mysql for instance by increasing the default query cache.
Mandriva

The Perfect Server - Mandriva 2010.1 (Spring) Free (x86_64) [ISPConfig 2]

Post date: July 18, 2010, 17:07 Category: Installing Views: 5781 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up a Mandriva 2010.1 (Spring) Free (x86_64) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. In the end you should have a system that works reliably, and if you like you can install the free webhosting control panel ISPConfig 2 (i.e., ISPConfig runs on it out of the box). This tutorial is written for the 64-bit version of Mandriva 2010.1.
Gentoo

Tunneling the hard way: using slirp, pppd and socat

Post date: January 29, 2006, 13:01 Category: Network Views: 13280 Comments
Tutorial quote: Every now and then you might come across a "bad" ISP. The one I have at home for example is dropping UDP packets ever so often when I try to play online games -- and it tends to drop random packets while I try to log onto a gameserver too which makes a certain game I like to play crash during the loading phase so it can't recover. I also heard of other ISPs blocking certain ports on external servers -- universities for example seem to like blocking p2p network ports and the school i was attending till last august blocked everything but port 80 for http -- including ftp which made even on-topic "research" a pita at times.
Usually there's three ways of working around this problem if "giving up" is not an option to you: a) change your ISP, b) use ssh to redirect ports, c) connect to an external VPN to route for you. a) can be tricky -- it's impossible if you're sharing the link with your parents and they insist on their email addresses or in the university/workplace/school scenario. b) will only work with single port/host combinations and for c) you will need a full-fledged rootbox idling around on the internet -- which tend to be expensive and "virtual servers" might not work because those often don't include tun/tap devices and/or kernel-level ppp support if you rent them and in case you rented them you probably can't fiddle around with its kernel to enable it (that was my problem at least). If any of this rings a bell to you, read on and discover method d)
Ubuntu

Running SugarCRM Community Edition On Nginx (LEMP) (Debian Squeeze/Ubuntu 11.04)

Post date: November 3, 2011, 08:11 Category: Installing Views: 21865 Comments
Tutorial quote: SugarCRM is a webbased CRM solution written in PHP. SugarCRM is available in different flavours called "Editions" ("Community" (free), "Professional", and "Enterprise"). In this tutorial I will describe the installation of the free Community Edition on a Debian Squeeze or Ubuntu 11.04 system that has nginx installed instead of Apache (LEMP = Linux + nginx (pronounced "engine x") + MySQL + PHP). With the modules My Portal, Calendar, Activities, Contacts, Accounts, Leads, Opportunities, Cases, Bugtracker, Documents and Email, SugarCRM Community Edition offers everything that can be expected from a CRM solution.
FreeBSD

Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd

Post date: December 1, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 8818 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Debian

Setting up a local web server in Debian Linux

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Network Views: 3493 Comments
Tutorial quote: Any web developer, designer, or webmaster can benefit from having a local web server. Even if that developer has no interest in securing and maintaining the server his or her websites live on, a local server can act as a convenient mirror for testing updates, trying new designs, and other general sand-boxing activities.

Web developers whose hosts utilize the popular LAMP platform (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) are frequently hit with a dilemma. Since understanding Linux is not a prerequisite for website administrators, many of them lack the knowledge necessary for setting up a LAMP server from scratch (or at least they may think so). But thanks to the improved package management on Linux distributions like Debian, installing a functional web server is not nearly the chore it was just a couple years ago.
RedHat

Ruby on Rails on Red Hat

Post date: November 27, 2006, 07:11 Category: Network Views: 8419 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ruby on Rails is an open source freely available web development framework. It's been quite popular--it won a Jolt "Web Development Tools" award last year, and some prominent Java developers have publically switched to Ruby on Rails. The buzz surrounding Rails is quite impressive--particularly when you consider that Rails had no Fortune 500 company to market it, unlike .NET or Java.

Rails is a Model View Controller (MVC) framework. As you can imagine from the name, applications written using Model View Controller frameworks have three main components: a model, which represents the data and associated logic; the view, which represents how a user interacts with the application; and the controller, which contains all of the business logic that drives the application. This is an artificial distinction, of course, but it is a powerful one.

You'll need Apache 2.0+ and MySQL installed on your Red Hat Linux computer to run these examples.
Unix+clones

Making Web Browsing Easy For The Tiny Screen

Post date: August 9, 2005, 19:08 Category: Network Views: 3641 Comments
Tutorial quote: An avalanche of content will soon appear in the palm of your hand.

Tiny screens are showing up everywhere in PDAs and cell phones. Many are equipped with some form of network device and a browser, so it's not hard to see what's coming down the pike.

Late model PDAs, like my HP iPAQ 3715 no longer suffer from insufficient computing power, lack of memory or having to rely on pricey external 802.11b cards. The little machine is quick to boot up and can handle many daily business functions.

Even though it runs a version of Internet Explorer, jumping onto an access point and browsing web pages is fast and useful.

In this edition, I'll share my observations on things you might consider when converting LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) applications or web pages, for use on the tiny screen. I'll approach the issues from an iPAQ user perspective and focus on convenience and making the user's life easy.
Debian

How To Speed Up Drupal 7.7 With Boost And nginx (Debian Squeeze)

Post date: August 21, 2011, 18:08 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3042 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can speed up your Drupal 7.7 installation on a LAMP stack (Debian Squeeze) with the help of Boost and nginx. Boost provides static page caching for Drupal enabling a very significant performance and scalability boost for sites that receive mostly anonymous traffic. Boost makes sure that your logged-in users always get fresh content by not caching pages for logged-in users. In a first step I will show how to make your site faster by enabling Boost on a normal LAMP stack (Apache2, PHP, MySQL), and in a second step I explain how to make your site even faster by using nginx as a reverse proxy sitting in front of Apache and delivering the static HTML pages cached by Boost. nginx delivers static files a lot of faster than Apache and uses less memory/CPU.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink