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Search results for Wardriving Using An Ubuntu Notebook With Garmin Etrex, Kismet, And GPSDrive

Ubuntu

Wardriving Using An Ubuntu Notebook With Garmin Etrex, Kismet, And GPSDrive

Post date: December 28, 2006, 21:12 Category: Network Views: 5880 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial is about wardriving using GPS. It explains how to install Garmin Etrex on Ubuntu and how to configure it. It also shows how to use Garmin with GPSDrive and how to convert the data to an xml file which can be imported by Google Earth.
Ubuntu

Kismet – An 802.11 wireless network detector, sniffer, and intrusion detection system

Post date: September 2, 2009, 13:09 Category: Software Views: 3626 Comments
Tutorial quote: Kismet is a 802.11b wireless network sniffer. It is capable of sniffing using almost any supported wireless card using the Airo, HostAP, Wlan-NG, and Orinoco (with a kernel patch) drivers.Kismet identifies networks by passively collecting packets and detecting standard named networks, detecting (and given time, decloaking) hidden networks, and infering the presence of nonbeaconing networks via data
traffic.
Linux

WiFi PDA Meets Linux--Part 3

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Software Views: 2557 Comments
Tutorial quote: Did you know that your new WiFi-equipped iPAQ can be used as a VoIP communicator? How about your Linux notebook? The program that makes it possible is called Skype and it lets you call other Skype users over the Internet for free. You can also call regular phone numbers for very competitive per-minute rates. As it turns out, Skype is available for both platforms and Windows, too. Although it's not an Open Source solution, it is freely available and fits nicely into our WiFi-PDA-meets-Linux bag of tools.

Join me now to discover how you can use the program on the iPAQ and a Linux notebook.
Linux

Organizing Your Desktop Communications

Post date: April 13, 2005, 02:04 Category: Software Views: 2415 Comments
Tutorial quote: Today we'll look at two great utilities: Tuxcards, the ultimate digital notebook and organizer of zillions of tiny bits of information, and how to use SpamAssassin with KMail without having to run your own mailserver.
Fedora

Watching Your Power Consumption With Powertop On Fedora 7

Post date: October 1, 2007, 10:10 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2975 Comments
Tutorial quote: Powertop is a command-line tool released by Intel that shows you the power consumption of the applications running on your system. It works best on notebooks with Intel mobile processors and can help you find out the programs that put a strain on your notebook battery. It requires kernel 2.6.21 or newer with tickless idle enabled (CONFIG_NO_HZ) (which is currently available for 32-bit kernels only). Fedora 7 comes with a 2.6.21 kernel by default, so we can use Powertop on it.
Linux

Upstream Provider Woes? Point the Ping of Blame

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 2415 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your users are complaining that "the Internet is, like, all slow." Users are always complaining, but you're seeing a lot of timeouts when you check mail, surf the Web, or try to log in for remote administration. Or even worse, latency is so bad that you keep getting killed all to heck in your favorite gory violent online multi-player game, so you know there is a problem. But there a lot of potential bottlenecks between your PC and the outside world, like your Internet gateway, proxy server, firewall, Internet service provider, and so forth, so where do you begin?

One of the best and most versatile network tools you can have is a notebook PC running Linux. This lets you plug in anywhere to run tests and find out what is going on. Make it a nothing-to-lose box--don't keep data on it so you can wipe and reinstall the operating system as necessary, because you want to be able to run tests outside of firewalls. Don't run any services. You can put a minimal iptables firewall on it, as there is no point in being totally exposed, but keep it simple. (Use MondoRescue to make a system snapshot for fast restores.)
Ubuntu

How to Upgrade Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid) to Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty)

Post date: April 24, 2009, 06:04 Category: System Views: 3744 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop and Server editions and Ubuntu Netbook Remix, continuing Ubuntu’s tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution.This tutorial will explain how to Upgrade Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibix) to Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) released on the 23rd March 2009.

Ubuntu

Upgrade Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid) to Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty) Beta

Post date: March 30, 2009, 07:03 Category: System Views: 3419 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu 9.0 is the upcoming version of the Ubuntu operating system. The common name given to this release from the time of its early development was “Jaunty Jackalope”.This tutorial will explain how to upgrade ubuntu 8.10 to ubuntu 9.04 beta.

Ubuntu

Installing Xen On An Ubuntu 8.04 Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

Post date: May 8, 2008, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 3051 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Hardy Heron (Ubuntu 8.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files (apart from a fixed Ubuntu Xen kernel to enable networking for the virtual machines) or compilation are needed.
Ubuntu

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu Studio 7.04

Post date: May 16, 2007, 00:05 Category: Desktop Views: 4839 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu Studio is a special Linux distribution tailored to the needs of audio, video, and graphic enthusiasts or professionals. Because Ubuntu Studio is based on Ubuntu, you are not limited to this area, but can install any application that is available for Ubuntu, thus turning Ubuntu Studio into a normal desktop for everyday use. This tutorial shows how you can turn Ubuntu Studio 7.04 into a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
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