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Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 10 Server

Post date: March 22, 2009, 13:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2948 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 10 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 14 Server

Post date: December 19, 2010, 17:12 Category: Installing Views: 2375 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 14 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 13 Server

Post date: June 20, 2010, 11:06 Category: Installing Views: 2354 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 13 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.
Fedora+Core

The Perfect Desktop - Part 1: Fedora Core 6

Post date: February 22, 2007, 19:02 Category: Desktop Views: 6453 Comments
Tutorial quote: With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. This tutorial is the first of a series of articles where I will show people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Fedora Core 6 in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop, i.e. that has all software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.
Fedora

Virtualization With VirtualBox 3.1.x On A Headless Fedora 12 Server

Post date: March 11, 2010, 13:03 Category: Installing Views: 2438 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can run virtual machines with Sun VirtualBox 3.1.x on a headless Fedora 12 server. Normally you use the VirtualBox GUI to manage your virtual machines, but a server does not have a desktop environment. Fortunately, VirtualBox comes with a tool called VBoxHeadless that allows you to connect to the virtual machines over a remote desktop connection, so there's no need for the VirtualBox GUI.
Fedora+Core

Tripwire on your Fedora Box

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Security Views: 4896 Comments
Tutorial quote: Tripwire is an Intrusion Detection System. This can be used to alert users whenever their system is compromised. Tripwire detects and reports changes in system files. It will alert you through email whenever a change is detected. If the change is due to normal system activity, you can instruct Tripwire not to report the change to that file in future. If the change is not due to normal system activity, then it is a clear indication that something is wrong and you need to act immediately and fix the issue. Thus tripwire comes very handy to maintain the integrity of the system.

There is lot of information on the web about Tripwire. Some people might argue that AIDE (Advanced Intrusion Detection Environment) is better than tripwire and so on. This comparison is beyond the scope of this article. This is an introductory article for novice users who are interested in installing Tripwire on their Fedora Box. Advanced users can refer to the web for relevant information or they can contact appropriate mailing lists like fedora users mailing list.
Fedora

Enabling Compiz Fusion On A Fedora 8 GNOME Desktop (ATI Mobility Radeon 9200)

Post date: November 15, 2007, 12:11 Category: Desktop Views: 4068 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on a Fedora 8 GNOME desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card - I am using an ATI Mobility Radeon 9200 here). With Compiz Fusion you can use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube on your desktop.
Fedora

Using iSCSI On Fedora 10 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: May 28, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3979 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Fedora 10. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Fedora

Installing SugarCRM Community Edition On Fedora 14

Post date: December 5, 2010, 17:12 Category: Installing Views: 2093 Comments
Tutorial quote: SugarCRM is a webbased CRM solution written in PHP. SugarCRM is available in different flavours called "Editions" ("Community" (free), "Professional", and "Enterprise"). For a detailed overview of the different editions, have a look at the SugarCRM website. In this tutorial I will describe the installation of the free Community Edition on Fedora 14. With the modules My Portal, Calendar, Activities, Contacts, Accounts, Leads, Opportunities, Cases, Bugtracker, Documents and Email, SugarCRM Community Edition offers everything that can be expected from a CRM solution.
Fedora+Core

Set Up A Fedora 7 Mail Server Using Qmail Toaster

Post date: June 20, 2007, 23:06 Category: Installing Views: 8117 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install a Fedora 7 mail server based on Qmail using Qmail Toaster. Qmail is an Internet Mail Transfer Agent (MTA) for UNIX-like operating systems. It is a drop-in replacement for the Sendmail system provided with UNIX operating systems. Qmail uses the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) to exchange messages with MTAs on other systems.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink