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Search results for WiFi PDA Meets Linux--Part 3

Linux

WiFi PDA Meets Linux--Part 3

Post date: May 28, 2005, 22:05 Category: Software Views: 2558 Comments
Tutorial quote: Did you know that your new WiFi-equipped iPAQ can be used as a VoIP communicator? How about your Linux notebook? The program that makes it possible is called Skype and it lets you call other Skype users over the Internet for free. You can also call regular phone numbers for very competitive per-minute rates. As it turns out, Skype is available for both platforms and Windows, too. Although it's not an Open Source solution, it is freely available and fits nicely into our WiFi-PDA-meets-Linux bag of tools.

Join me now to discover how you can use the program on the iPAQ and a Linux notebook.
Linux

How To Secure An SSL VPN With One-Time Passcodes And Mutual Authentication

Post date: June 30, 2007, 23:06 Category: Security Views: 3431 Comments
Tutorial quote: SSL-based VPNs were designed to eliminate the need for complex configurations on the user's PC. Unfortunately, that was before the dangers of public WiFi networks and tougher regulatory requirements came into being. Thanks to WiFi, many attacks that were difficult are now quite simple. In particular, a man-in-the-middle attack can intercept SSL-encrypted traffic, rendering SSL-based VPNs useless - even if it is protected by a typical one-time password system. The man-in-the-middle can easily feed the one-time password into the SSL-based VPN within the alloted time.
FreeBSD

Working with gmirror on a Sun Fire X2100 (part 2)

Post date: August 29, 2006, 15:08 Category: System Views: 3462 Comments
Tutorial quote: Editorial note: This is the followup to Greg's previous piece, and continues where part one left off. It is recommended that you read and understand the content presented in part one before attempting any of the procedures documented here. Now without further ado...
Debian

Network profiles for a laptop

Post date: December 23, 2005, 00:12 Category: Network Views: 2546 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article explains how to configure networking in a very pleasant way, so that it works automatically wherever you go. It is adaptable to lots of uses, and may be usefull even if you don't use Wifi but connect to multiple networks.
RedHat

My First Linux Server, Part 2

Post date: April 14, 2005, 22:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3739 Comments
Tutorial quote: A file server is a specialized PC that holds large numbers of files that many people on a network can access. It "serves up" files to everyone instead of each person having files on his or her own PC. The good news is that you don't have to be a network guru to set up a basic file server. If you followed the Easy Linux Install steps in Part 1, you are ready to set up a Linux PC as a file server.

While there are many ways to set up a network and a server, this article concentrates on the simplest approaches with the highest chance of quick success.
Debian

Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: Software Views: 2772 Comments
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Ubuntu

Installing and configuring FireHOL - Part 2

Post date: September 20, 2006, 22:09 Category: Network Views: 7220 Comments
Tutorial quote: This is the second part of the introduction to FireHOL article. It covers more advanced topics that you might find useful, such as defining new services, selective filtering, and NAT. Everything is explained in a very detailed fashion.
Ubuntu

Enable WPA Wireless access point in Ubuntu

Post date: February 15, 2007, 01:02 Category: Network Views: 4511 Comments
Tutorial quote: I have a Thoshiba laptop at home, I was running “Edgy Eft” (Ubuntu Linux 6.10) But one of the important things about it was its inability to connect to WPA-encrypted Wifi access points.In my home i have a WPA Enabled Wireless router so i need to connect to my wireless network using WPA.I am giving the procedure that worked for me to enable wpa in my toshiba laptop.This will work most of ubuntu users who is trying to access WPA network.
Linux

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Post date: May 26, 2006, 18:05 Category: System Views: 2743 Comments
Tutorial quote: The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools.

The cpio command has two unusual features

Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

This feature means that cpio must be used as part of a multiple command or with a redirection pipe. Examples of this usage are shown in the tables below.

cpio must always be used with one of three flags. Flags are options that set the mode in which the command runs. Only one flag can be used at a time, and it must come before any other options. In addition, the choice of flags limits the options that can be used. Each flag also has a gnu option that can used in its place. The gnu option gives a convenient name for each flag: extract, create, and pass- through.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3619 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
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