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Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 1

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3580 Comments
Tutorial quote: Wireless hardware for Linux is a moving target. The wireless network adapter that worked fine with Linux yesterday may be released with an unsupported radio chipset today, and with no indication of the change. So buyer beware--always confirm the chipset before you buy. The good news is a lot of wireless adapters have native Linux support, and for those that don't, the NdisWrapper utility lets you use the Windows drivers on your Linux box.
PC-BSD

The Perfect Desktop - PC-BSD 1.5

Post date: March 20, 2008, 12:03 Category: Desktop Views: 8118 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up PC-BSD v1.5. This release is based upon FreeBSD 6.3 and uses KDE 3.5.8 as default desktop environment. Taken from the PC-BSD page: PC-BSD is a complete desktop operating system, which has been designed with the "casual" computer user in mind. It offers the stability and security that only a BSD-based operating system can bring, while as the same time providing a comfortable user experience, allowing you to get the most out of your computing time. With PC-BSD you can spend less time working to fix viruses or spyware and instead have the computer work for you.
Linux

Setting Up A Subversion Repository Using Apache, With Auto Updatable Working Copy

Post date: June 19, 2007, 02:06 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3053 Comments
Tutorial quote: Subversion is a free/open-source version control system. That is, Subversion manages files and directories over time. A tree of files is placed into a central repository. The repository is much like an ordinary file server, except that it remembers every change ever made to your files and directories. This allows you to recover older versions of your data, or examine the history of how your data changed. In this regard, many people think of a version control system as a sort of time machine.
Unix+clones

Detailed Guide On Arrays In PHP

Post date: February 8, 2007, 02:02 Category: Programming Views: 4629 Comments
Tutorial quote: Here is yet another article of Fast PHP Articles Series. Today we are going to discuss ARRAYS. We will learn its syntax, its different types, the different built-in array functions that help to perform different tasks related to arrays quickly and different practical examples explaining the use of arrays in PHP.

By the end of this article you should be able to:

- Define Arrays
- Use different types of Arrays
- Use different Built-in functions related to Arrays e.g list(), each(), var_dump, print_r, var_export()

- Write basic as well as complex php code using Arrays.
- Working with multidimensional arrays
- Understanding Foreach loop with the help of different examples
Ubuntu

A much easier way to install Ubuntu on a USB device (Stick or Hard Disk)!

Post date: June 1, 2008, 21:06 Category: Software Views: 4222 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial will explain A much easier way to install Ubuntu on a USB device (Stick or Hard Disk).I was reading How to install Ubuntu Linux from USB Stick posted a while ago, and found it to be quite some work to get Ubuntu working on a USB stick. Besides, having to prepare your USB device, creating a separate partition on it which will be more or less “useless” after the installation, giving up 750MB of space?

Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part II

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3349 Comments
Tutorial quote: As we discussed in last week's article, for most of its existence, people have distributed Linux as a workstation or a server rather than as a desktop. The default workstation that evolved has existed mostly for use by developers. So, when you install a Linux distribution with a graphical interface, it generally looks like what a developer might want. In addition, it performs similar to how many UNIX workstations work, which can seem slow.

In this article, we continue to look at the Linux desktop in a different light. Here, we think of it as a computer system with a fast interface that we can optimize for the knowledge worker and consumer.
Ubuntu

Setting up squid proxy server on Ubuntu (Quick Start Guide)

Post date: October 10, 2010, 05:10 Category: Software Views: 4123 Comments
Tutorial quote: Squid is an internet proxy server that can be used within a network to distribute an internet connection to all the computers within the network. One central computer is connected to the internet through any means such as dial-up, cable modem, ISDN, DSL, or T1, runs squid, and thus acts as the firewall to the internet. Because it is a proxy, it has the capabilities to log all user actions such as the URLs visited. There are many features that can be configured in squid. This guide is meant to be a quick start guide for those who are eager to get squid working and then configure it from there.
Ubuntu

Drupal 6 Hosting With nginx And PHP-FastCGI On Ubuntu 9.10

Post date: April 8, 2010, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 3972 Comments
Tutorial quote: Drupal is a great CMS but is a bit hefty when you host it on bargain-basement shared hosting, and virtual private servers are great but memory-constrained at the low-end. Apache can be a big offender when it comes to resource usage, so a nice alternative is nginx, a fast, light-weight and efficient http server that supports PHP via PHP-FastCGI. So this is a pretty slick setup for hosting Drupal, and I've taken a few different howtos and forum posts to put together this guide, which should have all you need in one stop, including a working URL rewrite config.
Linux

Building a Linux Cluster, Part 3: How To Get Started

Post date: April 25, 2005, 14:04 Category: Network Views: 2584 Comments
Tutorial quote: In the previous two articles in this series, we examined some of the whys and whats of building Linux clusters. This article concludes our series by concentrating on the hows of cluster building. We've seen that a clustered approach to certain computing solutions can save lots of money in hardware and support costs. Now our job is to produce a method of building clusters that's repeatable and predictable—we don't want to give back our hard-won savings in project cost overruns.
Debian

Stack Smashing Protection for Debian

Post date: June 23, 2006, 22:06 Category: Security Views: 2823 Comments
Tutorial quote: Since we last covered the use of Stack Smashing Protection (SSP) the default compiler for Debian Sid has been upgraded to include it, with no need for custom patching. Read on for a brief demonstration of how it can be used to prevent attacks.

The default C compiler for Sid, which will be used in Etch too, is GCC v4.1. This releasecontains the SSP patch which previously needed to be applied manually (we demonstrated applying this patch for GCC v3.4 a long time ago).

Since the SSP patch is included in the compiler by default it is suddenly a lot easier to start working with it.
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