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Unix+clones

Streaming music with SlimServer

Post date: June 15, 2005, 16:06 Category: Network Views: 4035 Comments
Tutorial quote: Converting your CD collection into MP3 or another digital file format gives you the ability to enjoy the music on your computer and stream it all over the house and the Internet. To do the latter, however, you have to install and configure a streaming server on your computer. That might sound like a daunting task, but there is a streaming server application that makes the whole process pretty painless. SlimServer from Slim Devices is a cross-platform streaming server that runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X and supports a wide range of formats, including AAC, AIFF, FLAC, Ogg Vorbis, MP3, WAV, and WMA. Although it was developed to stream music files to Slim Devices' Squeezebox2 hardware player, it works perfectly with any software MP3 player capable of working with network streams.
Linux

Install OpenWRT, Chillispot, FreeRadius Based Managed Hotspot(s) Including PayPal Payment Gateway

Post date: March 23, 2008, 14:03 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 6745 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have ever tried to implement one of the hotspot HowTos on this and other sites, it might have dawned on you that this is not an easy feat to accomplish. Amazingly most solutions also leave out the most important part – how to get paid by the punters using the hotspot. Some will offer prepaid solution or access tickets that need to be printed, but this will require staff being involved on the premises. And in particular, once you want to offer a professional service and not just a toy concept it gets tricky – and expensive. Just imagine all the servers you need to provide redundant and load balanced freeradius, mysql and web servers. It is generally not worth the effort and expense for just one hotspot – unless of course you are willing to accept outages, unhappy customers etc.
FreeBSD

Configuring virtual domains with Cyrus+Postfix in FreeBSD 5.4

Post date: December 1, 2005, 03:12 Category: Software Views: 5234 Comments
Tutorial quote: Cyrus IMAP is an efficient IMAP server capable of handling a large number of accounts. Its biggest drawback is getting it installed and configured. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide on how to use Cyrus with the Postfix mail transfer agent (MTA). I tested these instructions with FreeBSD 5.4.

Postfix is a replacement for sendmail, the stock MTA that comes in FreeBSD. It is easier to configure and manage than sendmail. If you depend on sendmail, you can still look at the article for the Cyrus part, but you'll need to look elsewhere for the MTA configuration.

Unless otherwise instructed, perform all operations in this tutorial as root. You will need to use the port system. If you are new to it, check Chapter 4 of the FreeBSD Handbook.
Debian

Intrusion Detection With BASE And Snort

Post date: July 16, 2006, 16:07 Category: Security Views: 5161 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to install and configure BASE (Basic Analysis and Security Engine) and the Snort intrusion detection system (IDS) on a Debian Sarge system. BASE provides a web front-end to query and analyze the alerts coming from a Snort IDS system. With BASE you can perform analysis of intrusions that Snort has detected on your network.

Scenario: A linux server running Debian Sarge 3.1 setup according to Falko's - The Perfect Setup - Debian Sarge (3.1).
Let's assume we have one working website (www.example.com) and that the document root is: /var/www/www.example.com/web
The IP of the server is 192.168.0.5 and it's using eth0 as network interface name.
Linux

The Linux /proc Filesystem as a Programmers' Tool

Post date: June 22, 2005, 09:06 Category: Programming Views: 4019 Comments
Tutorial quote: My entry into systems programming was guided by my desire to understand further the operating systems I was working with daily as a contract UNIX and, later, Linux system administrator. The result of this was ifchk, a packet sniffer detector I wrote in C and released in June of 2003. ifchk initially was written under IRIX and then ported to Linux, mostly under the 2.4 kernel. The current ifchk revision, beta 4, recently was released and beta 5 is on the way.

My work on ifchk has allowed me to examine programmatically several areas of operating system functionality. Examples include the Linux netlink(7) and rtnetlink(7) facilities, device control--that is, network interfaces--via ioctl(2), signals and proc, the process filesystem. Proc and its ability to display a wide array of data concerning the runtime state of a system are the focus of our discussion here.
Debian

An apt-get primer

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 3319 Comments
Tutorial quote: If any single program defines the Debian Linux project, that program is apt-get. apt-get is Debian's main tool for installing and removing software. Working with the .deb package format, apt-get offers sophisticated package management that few Red Hat Package Manager RPM-based distributions can match.

Besides the convenience, an advantage of apt-get is that it reduces the chances of falling into dependency hell, that limbo where software installation fails for lack of another piece of software, whose installation fails for lack of another piece of software, and so on. If you know how Debian's archive system works, and how to choose the sources that apt-get uses, and use a few precautions in your upgrades, then the chances are that dependency problems will never bedevil you. Should you descend into dependency hell anyway, apt-get offers useful tools for climbing out of it.
Linux

Breaking the SHELL

Post date: May 29, 2005, 01:05 Category: Programming Views: 3821 Comments
Tutorial quote: Shell scripts are a part and parcel of almost all software applications running on UNIX, and the use simply spans from a trivial script, managing automatic database backup to bunch of scripts collaboratively doing complex operation on regular expressions.

Though it's a mere design decision to partition modules between scripts and programming language, but I personally feel that they sometimes come very handy saving lot of time and lines of code, when compared to implementing the same functionality in the programming language in context.And in fact with some exceptions, complexity of a shell script can scale to that of codes in C language. Add to this the power of all those numerous UNIX commands, and just think through, what can be achieved by shell scripts.
Here I will discuss few topics mainly relevant to intermediate shell programmers
Gentoo

Fbsplash on gentoo

Post date: April 12, 2005, 05:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 4281 Comments
Tutorial quote: Gensplash is a project started by Spock whose aim is to create a set of tools which could enrich the Gentoo boot process by displaying messages, animations, progress bars, etc. An explanation of the various things named *splash (bootsplash, gensplash, fbsplash, and splashutils) and how they relate to each other, can be found at Spock's Gensplash site.

Fbsplash is part of the gensplash project. According to fbsplash's documentation, "the framebuffer splash is a kernel feature that allows displaying a background picture on selected consoles and switching the first console to the so-called silent mode, while booting/rebooting/shutting down the system." The fbsplash device is accessed through the /dev/fbsplash device node. For fbsplash to work, a frame buffer device is required.
RedHat

Taking advantage of SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Security Views: 4516 Comments
Tutorial quote: The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 debuts the first commercially supported inclusion of Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). An installation of Red Hat's latest enterprise operating system has SELinux installed and enabled by default. In the past SELinux has been criticized for a lack of commercial support, many big sites were unable to use it due to the lack of support (Fedora Core 3 doesn't have the support that they require). Now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, SELinux is a supported part of the OS, and such objections to the use of SELinux have gone away. SELinux is now widely regarded as being suitable for the largest sites.
Linux

Building a Linux Cluster, Part 1

Post date: April 18, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 2929 Comments
Tutorial quote: Linux clusters have escaped. As the general popularity of the Linux operating system increases, more complex solutions built with it are becoming increasingly common in the "traditional" (more conservative) IT world. Linux computer clusters, whose provenance was originally universities and research institutions such as the U.S. National Laboratories, are showing up in increasing numbers as high-performance computing solutions within such areas as oil and gas exploration, computer-aided engineering, visualization, and software development. Linux clusters providing highly-available web, mail, and other infrastructure services are also increasingly common. If past computing history is any indicator of future trends, widespread use of Linux clusters in the mainstream IT world cannot be far behind.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink