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Search results for Xen Cluster Management With Ganeti On Debian Etch

Debian

Xen Cluster Management With Ganeti On Debian Etch

Post date: September 16, 2007, 21:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3171 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ganeti is a cluster virtualization management system based on Xen. In this tutorial I will explain how to create one virtual Xen machine (called an instance) on a cluster of two physical nodes, and how to manage and failover this instance between the two physical nodes.
Debian

Xen Cluster Management With Ganeti On Debian Lenny

Post date: March 3, 2009, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3886 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ganeti is a cluster virtualization management system based on Xen. In this tutorial I will explain how to create one virtual Xen machine (called an instance) on a cluster of two physical nodes, and how to manage and failover this instance between the two physical nodes.
Debian

Debian Etch And Xen From The Debian Repository

Post date: May 2, 2007, 22:05 Category: Installing Views: 2906 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an already working Debian Etch system. You can find all the software used here in the Etch repository, so no external files or compilation are needed.
Debian

How To Install The Openbravo ERP On Debian Etch

Post date: April 1, 2008, 11:04 Category: Installing Views: 3167 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to set up Openbravo ERP (enterprise management system) on Debian Etch. Taken from the Openbravo page: "Openbravo is an open source ERP solution designed specifically for the SME (small to midsize firm). Developed in a web based environment, it includes many robust functionalities which are considered part of the extended ERP: procurement and warehouse management, project and service management, production management, and financial management."
Linux

Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 2

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: System Views: 3003 Comments
Tutorial quote: We ended last time after configuring our first unprivileged Xen domain. In this article, we complete our cluster and then test it using an open-source parallel ray tracer. The first thing we need to do is create additional slave nodes to be used with the cluster. So, let's get down to business.
Linux

Building a Virtual Cluster with Xen

Post date: September 28, 2006, 04:09 Category: Emulation Views: 7510 Comments
Tutorial quote: It is a common practice to have development and test servers for each production server, so that you can experiment with changes without the fear of breaking anything important, but this is usually not feasible with clusters. So how do you try that new version of your favorite program before committing it to the production cluster? A cheap and convenient possibility is to build a virtual cluster.

Thanks to the Xen virtual machine monitor, you can create a number of virtual machines, all running simultaneously in your computer, install different operating systems in them, or just different configurations, and connect them via (virtual) network cards. Xen is a terrific tool for building virtual Beowulf clusters. It can prove useful when learning or teaching about clusters or for testing new features/software without the fear of causing major damage to an existing cluster.
Linux

Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 1

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: System Views: 3694 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you heard about Xen virtualization and want to get some hands-on experience? Do you want to experiment with Linux clustering but only have a single computer to devote to the cause? If you answered yes to either of these questions, keep reading.

In this article, I briefly introduce the concepts of Xen virtualization and Linux clustering. From there, I show you how to set up multiple operating systems on a single computer using Xen and how to configure them for use with clustering. I should point out that a cluster implemented in this manner does not provide the computational power of multiple physical computers. It does, however, offer a way to prototype a cluster as well as provide a cost-effective development environment for cluster-based software. Even if you're not interested in clustering, this article gives you hands-on experience using Xen virtualization.
Debian

How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster With MySQL 5.1

Post date: June 17, 2008, 09:06 Category: Installing Views: 3358 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5.1 cluster with five nodes: 1 x management, 2 x storage nodes and 2 x balancer nodes. This cluster is load-balanced by an Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).
Ubuntu

Load-Balanced High-Availability Web Cluster With 2 Xen Servers On Ubuntu 8.04

Post date: October 12, 2008, 12:10 Category: Installing Views: 2998 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this howto we will build a load-balanced and high-availability web cluster on 2 real servers with Xen, hearbeat and ldirectord. The cluster will do http, mail, DNS, MySQL database and will be completely monitored. This is currently used on a production server with a couple of websites. The goal of this tutorial is to achieve load balancing & high availability with as few real servers as possible and of course, with open-source software. More servers means more hardware & hosting cost.
Debian

How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster

Post date: March 31, 2006, 19:03 Category: Software Views: 3821 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5 cluster with three nodes: two storage nodes and one management node. This cluster is load-balanced by a high-availability load balancer that in fact has two nodes that use the Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).

In this document I use Debian Sarge for all nodes. Therefore the setup might differ a bit for other distributions. The MySQL version I use in this setup is 5.0.19. If you do not want to use MySQL 5, you can use MySQL 4.1 as well, although I haven't tested it.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
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