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Search results for Xen Disk I/O benchmarking: NetBSD dom0 vs Linux dom0

Debian

Creating A Fully Encrypted Para-Virtualised Xen Guest System Using Debian Lenny

Post date: May 3, 2009, 10:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3828 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document explains how to set up a fully encrypted para-virtualized XEN instance. In this howto, the host system is running Debian Etch, while the guest system to be installed will be using Debian Lenny. If you are concerned about your privacy, you might want to consider using hard disk encryption to protect your valuable private data from spying eyes. Usually, the easiest way would be to use your distribution's installer to set up a fully encrypted system; I think most recent Linux distributions support this. However, when you are using XEN to provide virtualization, there are situations where you might not want to encrypt your whole computer with all guest instances, but instead only encrypt one OS instance. This howto will deal with exactly this situation. It assumes that the XEN host system is already up and running.
FreeBSD

Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd

Post date: December 1, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 8174 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Unix+clones

Using MySQL to benchmark OS performance

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3898 Comments
Tutorial quote: It seems to be an exciting time for *nix operating systems, with a number of them recently releasing new versions that bring the addition of expanded features and claims of improved performance. If you're using GNU/Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, or Solaris as a database server, you've probably recently considered an upgrade or switch to another OS in that list due to marketing hype and hearsay. This article will show you how to benchmark operating system performance using MySQL on these OSes so you can find out for yourself if you're missing out. While this may not necessarily be indicative of overall system performance or overall database application performance, it will tell you specifically how well MySQL performs on your platform.

The following operating systems were used for the comparison testing:
- FreeBSD 4.11
- FreeBSD 5.3
- NetBSD 2.0
- Linux 2.6
- Linux 2.4
- Solaris 10 x86 (build 69)
- OpenBSD 3.6
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3308 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
Linux

Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 1

Post date: January 21, 2006, 06:01 Category: System Views: 4040 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you heard about Xen virtualization and want to get some hands-on experience? Do you want to experiment with Linux clustering but only have a single computer to devote to the cause? If you answered yes to either of these questions, keep reading.

In this article, I briefly introduce the concepts of Xen virtualization and Linux clustering. From there, I show you how to set up multiple operating systems on a single computer using Xen and how to configure them for use with clustering. I should point out that a cluster implemented in this manner does not provide the computational power of multiple physical computers. It does, however, offer a way to prototype a cluster as well as provide a cost-effective development environment for cluster-based software. Even if you're not interested in clustering, this article gives you hands-on experience using Xen virtualization.
Linux

How to create System Image

Post date: November 17, 2008, 11:11 Category: System Views: 3811 Comments
Tutorial quote: Suppose you have a 40GB hard disk and a removable hard disk whose capacity is 60GB, and you want to backup all the files from the hard disk to the removable disk. With "dd", it is a very easy task. Again, suppose your hard disk's Unix device name is /dev/sda and the removable disk is /dev/sdb. The following command can copy all the content from /dev/sda to /dev/sdb:
OSX

Recover a dead hard drive using dd

Post date: October 23, 2006, 03:10 Category: System Views: 16014 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Unix program dd is a disk copying util that you can use at the command line in order to make a disk image. It makes a bit-by-bit copy of the drive it's copying, caring nothing about filesystem type, files, or anything else. It's a great way to workaround the need for Norton Ghost.

Normally, in order to make a disk image, the disk you're copying from has to be able to spin up and talk -- in other words, it's OK to make a copy if the disk is healthy. But what happens when your disk is becoming a doorstop? As long as it continues to spin, even with physical damage on the drive, dd and Mac OS X will get you out of the fire.
Debian

Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel

Post date: December 29, 2005, 07:12 Category: System Views: 3834 Comments
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
Linux

Benchmarking Maildir Delivery on Linux Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3417 Comments
Tutorial quote: The goal of this set of benchmarks is to determine which of the leading Linux filesystems (ext2, ext3, ReiserFS, and XFS) offer the best performance when used for accepting maildir deliveries. The resulting system should be a good balance of delivery and retrieval performance under potentially high concurrent filesystem load.
Debian

Xen from Backports on Debian Sarge

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: Software Views: 3046 Comments
Tutorial quote: There is a great howto about installing Xen on Debian Unstable. It is really easy to do and it runs fine. Nevertheless, on production servers, that's not an optimal solution. Debian Unstable has too many updates and things change too often. On production machines, a Xen host system should be stable, secure and should not need much attention. That is where Sarge comes in. If you pull the Xen packages from backports and install them on Debian stable you've got the best of both worlds. Let's do so!
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