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Search results for Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 2

Debian

Installing Xen 3.0 upon Debian Unstable, with a custom Kernel

Post date: December 29, 2005, 07:12 Category: System Views: 3551 Comments
Tutorial quote: Recently we demonstrated the process of installing a binary release of Xen 3.0 on Sarge, since the packages on Debian Unstable are not yet available for Xen 3.0 we're now going to look at installing it via the packages provided by Ralph Passgang. This also includes building a custom Xen kernel from source.

The advantage to building the Xen kernel from source is that you can add, or remove, drivers - so the kernel is utterly customised for your system.
Debian

OpenVZ On Debian Etch For Webservers

Post date: December 26, 2006, 21:12 Category: System Views: 3316 Comments
Tutorial quote: Virtualization is a good practice for servers, since it makes things more secure, scalable, replacable, and replicable, all this at the cost of little added complexity. This guide was written during an install of a Supermicro machine with two dual-core opterons (64-bit), two identical disks (for RAID) and a load of memory. Why OpenVZ and not XEN or the recent KVM kernel module? Well, XEN is not very stable for 64-bit architectures (yet), and it comes with quite a bit of overhead (every VM runs its own kernel) due to its complexity. KVM is very simple but restricts you to run a kernel as one process, so the VM cannot benefit from multi core systems.
OpenSUSE

Install and Configure VMWare Server virtualization in openSUSE

Post date: August 10, 2008, 22:08 Category: Emulation Views: 6339 Comments
Tutorial quote: VMware Server is a free virtualization product for Windows and Linux servers. VMware Server is a robust yet easy to use server virtualization product and is based on proven virtualization technology. Learn how to install configure and use VMware server in openSUSE
Debian

Xen from Backports on Debian Sarge

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: Software Views: 2774 Comments
Tutorial quote: There is a great howto about installing Xen on Debian Unstable. It is really easy to do and it runs fine. Nevertheless, on production servers, that's not an optimal solution. Debian Unstable has too many updates and things change too often. On production machines, a Xen host system should be stable, secure and should not need much attention. That is where Sarge comes in. If you pull the Xen packages from backports and install them on Debian stable you've got the best of both worlds. Let's do so!
CentOS

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.2 (i386)

Post date: November 9, 2008, 12:11 Category: Installing Views: 4946 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a CentOS 5.2 system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 2722 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
CentOS

The Perfect Setup - OpenVZ with CentOS 4.4

Post date: November 12, 2006, 21:11 Category: System Views: 4932 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how to prepare a CentOS 4.4 server for OpenVZ virtual machines. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers.
Linux

How To Modify Your Gnu/Linux Box To Serve As A USB Over IP Server

Post date: January 7, 2010, 13:01 Category: Installing Views: 2751 Comments
Tutorial quote: There was a long time that I was looking for a way to put away my old CRM server! But why? Because I had installed a virtualization environment with Xen and all my servers are turned to small VPS on a nice pretty infrastructure. The base point was that the CRM had a USB/Lock and there was no way to take the lock under a virtualized VPS. This tutorial shows how you can set up a USB-over-IP server.
CentOS

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.3 (x86_64)

Post date: May 17, 2009, 13:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 4729 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.3 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
CentOS

Managing OpenVZ With HyperVM On CentOS 5.2

Post date: February 5, 2009, 12:02 Category: Installing Views: 4977 Comments
Tutorial quote: HyperVM is a multi-platform, multi-tiered, multi-server, multi-virtualization web based application that will allow you to create and manage different virtual machines each based on different technologies across machines and platforms. Currently it supports OpenVZ and Xen virtualization and is available for RHEL 4/5 as well as CentOS 4 and CentOS 5. This tutorial shows how to install it on a CentOS 5.2 server to control OpenVZ containers. I will also explain how to manage OpenVZ containers with HyperVM on a remote CentOS 5.2 server ("slave").
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