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Search results for ethernet naming convention in FreeBSD

FreeBSD

ethernet naming convention in FreeBSD

Post date: May 31, 2007, 04:05 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 5039 Comments
Tutorial quote: Little explanation on how ethernet naming convention work in FreeBSD
Debian

Ethernet Bonding Configuration in Debian

Post date: April 24, 2006, 19:04 Category: Network Views: 3744 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ethernet bonding refers to aggregating multiple ethernet channels together to form a single channel. This is primarily used for redundancy in ethernet paths or for load balancing. This page refers in particular to performing ethernet bonding under linux, and so does not limit itself to discussion of 802.3ad Trunk Aggregation.
Debian

Using ATA Over Ethernet On Debian Etch

Post date: October 17, 2007, 11:10 Category: Hardware Views: 6023 Comments
Tutorial quote: Imagine you have a machine with all of its disk full and another with unused gigabytes, and you do not want to move the data from one to the other. Why not use the second's disk on the first, you could do it with iSCSI, but you can do it with ATA over Ethernet (AoE) as well. It is the second method I will explain in this article. All of this was made with two computers running Debian Etch.
Fedora

Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) On Fedora 10 (Initiator And Target)

Post date: June 2, 2009, 10:06 Category: Installing Views: 3373 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an AoE target and an AoE initiator (client), both running Fedora 10. AoE stands for "ATA over Ethernet" and is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows AoE initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) AoE target using normal ethernet cabling. "Remote" in this case means "inside the same LAN" because AoE is not routable outside a LAN (this is a major difference compared to iSCSI). To the AoE initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
Debian

Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Post date: March 15, 2009, 12:03 Category: Installing Views: 3435 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide explains how you can set up an AoE target and an AoE initiator (client), both running Debian Lenny. AoE stands for "ATA over Ethernet" and is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows AoE initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) AoE target using normal ethernet cabling. "Remote" in this case means "inside the same LAN" because AoE is not routable outside a LAN (this is a major difference compared to iSCSI). To the AoE initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.
FreeBSD

Install FreeBSD 6.3 stable and 8.0 current inside FreeBSD 7 Stable

Post date: April 27, 2008, 07:04 Category: Installing Views: 6188 Comments
Tutorial quote: Install FreeBSD 6.3 and 8 inside FreeBSD 7 using jails. Tutorial also includes video.
FreeBSD

FreeBSD Install Guide

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Installing Views: 4085 Comments
Tutorial quote: A step-by-step guide to installing FreeBSD 5. It assumes moderate experience with linux and leaves you with a fully updated FreeBSD system.
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: April 3, 2006, 06:04 Category: System Views: 3547 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: December 7, 2007, 06:12 Category: Emulation Views: 5145 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
FreeBSD

Install FreeBSD 4,5,6 and 7

Post date: May 31, 2007, 04:05 Category: Installing Views: 5512 Comments
Tutorial quote: Just quick overview about process installation FreeBSD version 4,5,6 and 7 with link to download video
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