Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Search results for ethernet naming convention in FreeBSD

FreeBSD

Installing ProFTPD

Post date: August 26, 2005, 13:08 Category: Network Views: 3294 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document is about replacing the standard ftpd from the FreeBSD kernel with the fancier ProFTPd.
FreeBSD

Using Software RAID-1 with FreeBSD

Post date: November 29, 2005, 03:11 Category: System Views: 3657 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed a software RAID solution for a low-end server install? Perhaps you've wanted your workstation to take advantage of the redundancy provided by a disk mirror without investing in a hardware RAID controller. Has a prior painful configuration experience turned you off software RAID altogether on Unix systems?


Since 5.3-Release, FreeBSD comes with gmirror(8), which allows you to easily configure a software RAID 1 solution. While tutorials on gmirror exist, I found them to require either manual calculations of partition sizes with bsdlabel or the use of a fix-it floppy on an existing system.

It made more sense to me to configure RAID during the install of the operating system. I also wanted a procedure that was easy to follow and didn't introduce human error in the form of a math miscalculation. After cobbling together the available documentation and experimenting my way through various configurations, I came across a procedure that has worked well for me on several different systems. I also received valuable feedback from Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the author of gmirror, who gave some insight into some of the not yet documented features of gmirror.
FreeBSD

Installing FreeBSD on IBM Netvista S40

Post date: May 8, 2005, 21:05 Category: Installing Views: 3525 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this note we shall talk about installing FreeBSD on a very interesting and elegant machine: IBM Netvista S40. In its creator own terminology, it is "legacy-free". The computer has no parallel, serial, AT keyboard, nor PS/2 mouse ports. No floppy controller either. Instead, it has 5 USB ports (2 frontal and 3 rear) connected to a single USB controller. Besides these USB ports, the system only counts with standard video and audio connectors. The video controller is Intel 82810E SVGA and audio chip is Intel ICH 82801AA, both integrated onboard. The CPU is Intel PIII at 866MHz. The machine is further equipped with a fast Intel Pro PCI network adapter containing a PXE/RIPL boot prom. A quiet 20G Quantum Fireball HDD and a Liteon ATAPI CD-ROM, both connected as masters, constitute the storage subsystem. The case is Flex ATX, a small form factor.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems

Post date: April 12, 2005, 07:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2936 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently purchased a Western Digital 250GB/8M/7200RPM drive and wondered which journaling file system I should use. I currently use ext2 on my other, smaller hard drives. Upon reboot or unclean shutdown, e2fsck takes a while on drives only 40 and 60 gigabytes. Therefore I knew using a journaling file system would be my best bet. The question is: which is the best? In order to determine this I used common operations that Linux users may perform on a regular basis instead of using benchmark tools such as Bonnie or Iozone. I wanted a "real life" benchmark analysis. A quick analogy: Just because the Ethernet-Over-Power-Lines may advertise 10mbps (1.25MB/s), in real world tests, peak speed is only 5mbps (625KB/s). This is why I chose to run my own tests versus using hard drive benchmarking tools.
FreeBSD

Building a FreeBSD Build System

Post date: April 15, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 3605 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you finish this article, you will have an unbeatable update system. Even mergemaster will work faster. You will have an update system in which a machine update/upgrade will take less than 10 minutes.
FreeBSD

Working with gmirror on a Sun Fire X2100

Post date: August 12, 2006, 18:08 Category: System Views: 3461 Comments
Tutorial quote: Mirror setup. Recently I was given a brand new X2100 server made by Sun Microsystems. I installed FreeBSD on it and run a mailserver. The server has two 250GB SATA drives and I decided to use gmirror(8) to create RAID-1 on those disks.
BSD

Set Up PC-BSD v1.4 beta

Post date: September 1, 2007, 01:09 Category: Desktop Views: 6472 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how to set up PC-BSD v1.4 beta. PC-BSD is released under the BSD license. PC-BSD is a desktop operating system based on FreeBSD. It uses KDE as its desktop environment.
Debian

Setup an IPv6 Masquerade Box Under Debian Through IPv4

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 2637 Comments
Tutorial quote: Configuring IPv6 (over IPv4) under Debian, quite frankly, couldn't be easier. I had a somewhat difficult time in setting it up myself, but that was only because the guides I'd seen on the WWW were designed for operating systems such as FreeBSD. Thus, I have decided to write this document to promote IPv6, and to relieve the frustration of those looking for a no-fuss way to quickly configure IPv6 under Debian.
BSD

Network-Attached Storage With FreeNAS

Post date: February 13, 2007, 19:02 Category: Installing Views: 8801 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can set up a network-attached storage server with FreeNAS. FreeNAS is based on the FreeBSD operating system and supports CIFS (samba), FTP, NFS, RSYNC, SSH, local user authentication, and software RAID (0, 1, 5). It comes with a powerful web interface and uses very little space on the hard drive - about 32MB.
Linux

The Serial Console

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3173 Comments
Tutorial quote: In these modern times, a hardworking admin might be tempted to turn her back on the Old Ways, and indulge in increasingly exotic methods of interfacing with servers: SSH over ethernet, USB, Firewire, wireless, infrared, KVM switches, VNC, VPN... next stop: direct neural implants.

There's one old timer that still has useful place in the admin's tool kit: the serial console. Sure, it's slow and funky. But there are times it can be a real lifesaver. When nothing else works, it's a direct pipeline into your system. It's simple and cheap. You don't need to install drivers or expansion cards, it's just there.

Administration via serial console is common in data centers. Just imagine the nightmare of trying to connect all those rack units to keyboards and displays. The cabling can be extended to a nice comfortable ops center (well, an ops center, anyway). (This Lantronix Console Manager is an example of the type of device used to administer these.)

There are a number of ways to make the physical connection. You can connect an external modem--the kind us old timers fondly refer to as "real" modems--and do remote administration via dialup. It couldn't be any simpler, just dial direct. Or grab a null modem cable, connect to a laptop or a nearby workstation, and you have an instant terminal.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink