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Ubuntu

How to Set up Network Bonding in Ubuntu 6.10

Post date: February 16, 2007, 22:02 Category: Network Views: 6169 Comments
Tutorial quote: Network Bonding, otherwise known as port trunking allows you to combine multiple network ports into a single group, effectively aggregating the bandwidth of multiple interfaces into a single connection. For example, you can aggregate two gigabyte ports into a two-gigabyte trunk port. Bonding is used primarily to provide network load balancing and fault tolerance.
Debian

Using DSPAM & ClamAV With Postfix (Virtual Users) On Debian Etch

Post date: August 14, 2007, 23:08 Category: Security Views: 3961 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes how to integrate DSPAM with embedded ClamAV into a mail server based on Postfix featuring virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. DSPAM is a scalable and open-source content-based spam filter. The setup shown here is suitable for Debian Etch servers.
Linux

Cutting the tcp/ip network connection with cutter

Post date: December 13, 2005, 03:12 Category: Network Views: 3434 Comments
Tutorial quote: Recently I came across very powerful and nifty tool (used by one of our Sr. network admin). Just imagine that people in your private network using peer to peer software such as Kazaa, iMesh or others and you want to cut them or just want to cut all ftp connection over my firewall but not all traffic to host.
SGI

Installing IRIX 6.5 Across a Network

Post date: May 21, 2005, 10:05 Category: Installing Views: 6744 Comments
Tutorial quote: Installing across a network may be desirable for a number of reasons, usually speed, convenience (disks/CDROM attached to remote system) or necessity. I've done network installs on O2s, Octanes and Indys; in each case, a remote disk file system contained local copies of all the relevant 6.5 media.
FreeBSD

Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd

Post date: December 1, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 8431 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Unix+clones

Command your network with Kaboodle

Post date: June 28, 2005, 09:06 Category: Network Views: 3696 Comments
Tutorial quote: Quite often setting up a local network is much easier than managing it. Even technically challenged users can figure out how to connect a couple of computers and a printer. However, tasks like maintenance, troubleshooting, and remote secure connections require more than just "which-cable-goes-where" knowledge. You need something like Kaboodle, a nifty tool that can help you to manage your local network like a pro.

Kaboodle allows you to visualize your local network, control computers on it via VNC, and connect to other Kaboodle-enabled networks. Kaboodle was developed for Windows, but according to its Web site, it will happily run under Wine on Linux and FreeBSD.
Debian

How to Create an adhoc host with Ubuntu

Post date: March 2, 2009, 07:03 Category: System Views: 4704 Comments
Tutorial quote: Have you ever needed to wirelessly network a Windows PCís directly to a Ubuntu machine? In other words, you lack a router, switch, or other networking mechanism, each PC has a wireless device and you need to trade a file or play a network game? Read on.Ubuntuís NetworkManager 0.7.0 contains the necessary features for creating an Ubuntu adhoc network host.

Ubuntu

Setting Up Network RAID1 With DRBD On Ubuntu 11.10

Post date: November 1, 2011, 09:11 Category: Installing Views: 20270 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up network RAID1 with the help of DRBD on two Ubuntu 11.10 systems. DRBD stands for Distributed Replicated Block Device and allows you to mirror block devices over a network. This is useful for high-availability setups (like a HA NFS server) because if one node fails, all data is still available from the other node.
Debian

Setting Up Network RAID1 With DRBD On Debian Squeeze

Post date: August 23, 2011, 07:08 Category: Installing Views: 2668 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to set up network RAID1 with the help of DRBD on two Debian Squeeze systems. DRBD stands for Distributed Replicated Block Device and allows you to mirror block devices over a network. This is useful for high-availability setups (like a HA NFS server) because if one node fails, all data is still available from the other node.
Ubuntu

Monitoring Network Latency With Smokeping (Ubuntu 9.04)

Post date: July 16, 2009, 11:07 Category: Installing Views: 8245 Comments
Tutorial quote: This guide shows how to install and configure Smokeping on Ubuntu 9.04 to monitor network latency. SmokePing is a deluxe latency measurement tool. It can measure, store and display latency, latency distribution and packet loss. SmokePing uses RRDtool to maintain a longterm data-store and to draw pretty graphs, giving up to the minute information on the state of each network connection.
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