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Search results for screen: Keep Your Processes Running Despite A Dropped Connection

Linux

screen: Keep Your Processes Running Despite A Dropped Connection

Post date: December 12, 2006, 20:12 Category: System Views: 2735 Comments
Tutorial quote: I guess you all know this: you are connected to your server with SSH and in the middle of compiling some software (e.g. a new kernel) or doing some other task which takes lots of time, and suddenly your connection drops for some reason, and you lose your labour. This can be very annoying, but fortunately there is a small utility called screen which lets you reattach to a previous session so that you can finish your task. This short tutorial shows how to use screen for just this purpose.
Linux

Keep Your Processes Running Despite A Dropped Connection

Post date: February 17, 2009, 08:02 Category: Software Views: 2698 Comments
Tutorial quote: I guess you all know this: you are connected to your server with SSH and in the middle of compiling some software (e.g. a new kernel) or doing some other task which takes lots of time, and suddenly your connection drops for some reason, and you lose your labor. This can be very annoying, but fortunately there is a small utility called screen which lets you reattach to a previous session so that you can finish your task.
Ubuntu

Screen – Manages multiple sessions on one terminal

Post date: June 15, 2009, 06:06 Category: Software Views: 2440 Comments
Tutorial quote: Screen is a program that allows you to have multiple logins on one terminal. It is useful in situations where you are telnetted into a machine or connected via a dumb terminal and want more than just one login.screen-profiles includes a set of profiles for the GNU screen window manager. These profiles are quite useful on server machines which are not running a graphical desktop.
Unix+clones

Screen: an introduction and beginner's tutorial

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Software Views: 2519 Comments
Tutorial quote: Most modern Unix-based operating systems (e.g. Linux, MacOS X, and BSD) come with a little console-mode utility called GNU Screen. It's a powerful tool in the hands of the console warrior, a veritable Swiss Army knife of text-mode human-computer interaction.

This utility, despite its considerable usefulness, goes unused by a great many people. Why is this? Few people even know it's there, and those that do rarely understand the problem it solves. In this article, I will explain what screen does for you, and provide a simple set of instructions for accomplishing basic tasks using screen. My audience is those that are skilled with the command line but who have little or no experience with screen itself.
Linux

Today's Linux screen capture technology

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2478 Comments
Tutorial quote: "I'd like you to help me find out about video screen captures," said one of my editors a while back. "Sure, let me see what's available," I replied. He pointed me to a couple of Web sites to get me started, and here I am a few weeks later ready to share my findings. I'll discuss ways that you can make video clips in Linux, talk about their applications and shortcomings. I'll also cover suitable ways to view your masterpieces once they're recorded.

Video screen captures are useful for jobs like application training, computer instruction, or product demos. An example would be the little one-minute video I set up for my wife. She kept forgetting how to start up Mozilla Mail on her Windows 98 machine. I captured the mouse clicks and screen changes (in real time) as I ran through the process, saving it to a Macromedia Flash file. I then created a little Web page on one of my Apache servers, that described how to start Mozilla Mail and included a link to the Flash file. Instead of asking me how to do it, she can now just click on the video tutorial.
OpenSUSE

Qps Visual Process manager (X11 ps) in openSUSE

Post date: January 21, 2009, 07:01 Category: Software Views: 2872 Comments
Tutorial quote: Qps Visual Process Manager is an X11 version of “top” or “ps” that displays processes in a window and lets you sort and manipulate them. It displays some general system information, and many details about current processes (such as the TCP/UDP sockets in use by a process). Qps runs on Linux and Solaris.
Debian

pv (Pipe Viewer) - Shell pipeline element to meter data passing through

Post date: December 28, 2008, 22:12 Category: System Views: 3037 Comments
Tutorial quote: pv (Pipe Viewer) can be inserted into any normal pipeline between two processes to give a visual indication of how quickly data is passing through, how long it has taken, how near to completion it is, and an estimate of how long it will be until completion.To use it, insert it in a pipeline between two processes, with the appropriate options.

Ubuntu

Running Internet Explorer in Ubuntu Linux

Post date: December 29, 2006, 20:12 Category: Desktop Views: 3629 Comments
Tutorial quote: No clicks needed. No boring setup processes. No Wine complications. Just one easy script and you’ll get three IE versions to test your Sites. And it’s free and open source.This may be very helpful for software developers and web developers to test their applications.
Debian

Running Internet Explorer in Debian and ubuntu Linux

Post date: September 29, 2006, 23:09 Category: Installing Views: 5212 Comments
Tutorial quote: No clicks needed. No boring setup processes. No Wine complications. Just one easy script and you’ll get three IE versions to test your Sites. And it’s free and open source.This may be very helpful for software developers and web developers to test their applications.
Linux

Change Ctrl + Alt + Delete Behavior To Open System Monitor, in Linux

Post date: September 24, 2009, 12:09 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2019 Comments
Tutorial quote: Actually, I've written this post before (quite a few months ago) but then deleted it because it didn't work. In the mean time, I found out why, so I decided to post it again. I find pressing Control + Alt + Delete to open up System Monitor to be very useful, especially for Windows users who are used to it and may actually press this quite a few times before realizing it doesn't do anything or what it does in Windows. Using System Monitor, you can preview all running processes, end or kill them, see how much CPU a process is using, CPU + memory + network history, available disk space and even change how much CPU a process should use.

There are 2 ways of changing Ctrl + Alt + Delete behavior to open System Monitor: one if you are running Compiz, and one for Metacity, only to use if you are not running Compiz.
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