Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Debian tutorials
Debian

ACL(Access Control List) Configuration

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 3522 Comments
Tutorial quote: Access Control Lists (ACLs) provide a much more flexible way of specifying permissions on a file or other object than the standard Unix user/group/owner system. Windows NT and above, when running on an NTFS partition, use ACLs to specify permissions on files and directories. This document attempts to show how you can enable ACL support on your Linux box and use Samba to provide an SMB file server for use by machines in a Windows 2000 domain.

ACLs are best stored in the actual file system itself. To that end, there are patches available for ext2 and ext3 that enable ACL support using Extended Attributes (EAs). SGI's XFS also has ACL support built in, but XFS is not currently covered in this document.
Debian

Mplayer Configuration

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 2830 Comments
Tutorial quote: MPlayer is a movie and animation player that supports a wide range of codecs and file formats, including MPEG 1/2/4, DivX 3/4/5, Windows Media 7/8/9, RealAudio/Video up to 9, Quicktime 5/6, and Vivo 1/2. It has many MMX/SSE(2)/3Dnow(Ex) optimized native audio and video codecs, but allows using XAnim's and RealPlayer's binary codec plugins, and Win32 codec DLLs. It has basic VCD/DVD playback functionality, including DVD subtitles, but supports many text-based subtitle formats too. For video output, nearly every existing interface is supported. It's also able to convert any supported files to raw/divx/mpeg4 AVI (pcm/mp3 audio), and even video grabbing from V4L devices.
Debian

Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 2918 Comments
Tutorial quote: "Munin" means "memory".

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well. It makes it easy to determine "what's different today" when a performance problem crops up. It makes it easy to see how you're doing capacity wise on all limited resources.

It uses the excellent RRDTool and is written in Perl. Munin has a master/node architecture in which the master connects to all the nodes at regular intervals and asks them for sdata. It then stores the data in RRD files, and (if needed) updates the graphs. One of the main goals has been ease of creating new plugins (graphs).
Debian

Monitoring Services using Mon

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 3024 Comments
Tutorial quote: mon is a general-purpose scheduler and alert management tool used for monitoring service availability and triggering alerts upon failure detection. mon was designed to be open and extensible in the sense that it supports arbitrary monitoring facilities and alert methods via a common interface, all of which are easily implemented with programs in C, Perl, shell, etc., SNMP traps, and special mon traps.
Debian

MRTG Configuration in Debian Linux

Post date: April 4, 2006, 20:04 Category: Installing Views: 3913 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Multi Router Traffic Grapher (MRTG) is a tool to monitor the traffic load on network links. MRTG generates HTML pages containing PNG images which provide a LIVE visual representation of this traffic.
Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 3179 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
Debian

Setting Up A Highly Available NFS Server

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: Network Views: 6775 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this tutorial I will describe how to set up a highly available NFS server that can be used as storage solution for other high-availability services like, for example, a cluster of web servers that are being loadbalanced. If you have a web server cluster with two or more nodes that serve the same web site(s), than these nodes must access the same pool of data so that every node serves the same data, no matter if the loadbalancer directs the user to node 1 or node n. This can be achieved with an NFS share on an NFS server that all web server nodes (the NFS clients) can access.

As we do not want the NFS server to become another "Single Point of Failure", we have to make it highly available. In fact, in this tutorial I will create two NFS servers that mirror their data to each other in realtime using DRBD and that monitor each other using heartbeat, and if one NFS server fails, the other takes over silently. To the outside (e.g. the web server nodes) these two NFS servers will appear as a single NFS server.

In this setup I will use Debian Sarge (3.1) for the two NFS servers as well as for the NFS client (which represents a node of the web server cluster).
Debian

How To Set Up A Load-Balanced MySQL Cluster

Post date: March 31, 2006, 19:03 Category: Software Views: 4287 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how to configure a MySQL 5 cluster with three nodes: two storage nodes and one management node. This cluster is load-balanced by a high-availability load balancer that in fact has two nodes that use the Ultra Monkey package which provides heartbeat (for checking if the other node is still alive) and ldirectord (to split up the requests to the nodes of the MySQL cluster).

In this document I use Debian Sarge for all nodes. Therefore the setup might differ a bit for other distributions. The MySQL version I use in this setup is 5.0.19. If you do not want to use MySQL 5, you can use MySQL 4.1 as well, although I haven't tested it.

This howto is meant as a practical guide; it does not cover the theoretical backgrounds. They are treated in a lot of other documents in the web.
Debian

PostgreSQL Database Server Configuration in Debian

Post date: March 24, 2006, 17:03 Category: Software Views: 2731 Comments
Tutorial quote: PostgreSQL is a fully featured object-relational database management system. It supports a large part of the SQL standard and is designed to be extensible by users in many aspects. Some of the features are: ACID transactions, foreign keys, views, sequences, subqueries, triggers, user-defined types and functions, outer joins, multiversion concurrency control. Graphical user interfaces and bindings for many programming languages are available as well.
Debian

Gnu Privacy Guard (GPG)

Post date: March 21, 2006, 19:03 Category: Security Views: 3414 Comments
Tutorial quote: GNU Privacy Guard, or GPG, is a free replacement for the famous encryption tool PGP written by Phil Zimmermann. It is a tool for secure communication and data storage. It can be used to encrypt data and to create digital signatures. Here we'll provide a quick introduction to generating a key-pair and using it for basic tasks.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink