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NFS over CIPE-VPN tunnels

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Network Views: 3368 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Network File System (NFS) is a standard protocol for sharing file services with Linux and Unix computers. It is a distributed file system that enables local access to remote disks and file systems and is based on the client\server architecture. Although easy to configure, it is typically used only to transfer data over an intranet or LAN because of its transparency and security potholes when exposed to the risks of the Internet. However, it still can be employed -- without compromising security -- to share files over the Internet by configuring it to run on a Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. This article will show you how to set up NFS to run over a CIPE-VPN connection between two Linux systems.
Linux

Application optimization with compilers for Linux on POWER

Post date: May 23, 2005, 16:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 3305 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux on POWER platform offers more than one option to produce binary C/C++ code. In addition to supporting both 32- and 64-bit runtime environments simultaneously, Linux on POWER has two compiler collections. The GNU Compiler Collection, or GCC, is consistent with other Linux implementations with specific exceptions for the POWER architecture. GCC is the leading compiler for portability but also features a number of performance enhancements for optimizing code. The IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on POWER is derived from the high performance compiler for AIX but uses the GNU linker and assembler to create ELF objects that are fully compatible with objects produced by GCC. This document provides side-by-side comparisons of how these two compilers are controlled, overviews of what the compilers are capable of, in terms of optimization, and tips for writing code that is more easily optimized with either of these compilers.
Linux

The PartImage Handbook

Post date: May 21, 2005, 15:05 Category: Software Views: 3007 Comments
Tutorial quote: - Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX partition imaging utility: it saves partitions formatted using the Ext2FS (the linux standard), ReiserFS (a new journaled and powerful file system), JFS IBM journaled file systems from AIX, NTFS (Windows NT File System), FAT16/32 (DOS & Windows file systems), or HPFS (OS/2 file system) file system formats to an image file. Only used blocks are copied. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable media (ZIP for example), or burned on a CD-R ...

- This allows the user to save a full Linux/Windows system, with a single operation. When problems occur (viruses, crash, error, ...), you just have to restore, and after several minutes, all your system is restored (boot, files, ...), and fully working.

- This is very useful when installing the same software on many machines: just install one of them, create an image, and then restore the image on all other machines. After the first one, each subsequent installation can be made automaticaly, and only requires a few minutes.
Linux

Optimizing Desktop Performance, Part I

Post date: May 16, 2005, 23:05 Category: Optimizing Views: 4326 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you have complained about the speed of OpenOffice.org or Firefox or about the amount of time Linux takes to boot up, this set of optimizations should change your perception. Linux can boot up quickly, the word processor can spring open and the browser can fly. So, let's make these adjustments so your computer can fly.
Linux

DOSBox - A DOS Emulator

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: Emulation Views: 4065 Comments
Tutorial quote: Do you rely on legacy DOS apps. that are critical to the survival of your business? Me neither - I just want to play Frogger again...

One way of running those old favourites under Linux is to use the DOSBox software package.
Linux

Compiling Your Own Kernel

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: System Views: 2900 Comments
Tutorial quote: Once I decided to take the plunge and go for it, I realised it's not too hard at all. As long as you have a bootable floppy or CD to boot from if your new kernel doesn't work, you'll be OK.

For this simple guide, I'll assume that you use LILO as your boot manager.
Linux

DOS Emulation Under Linux

Post date: May 1, 2005, 17:05 Category: Emulation Views: 3658 Comments
Tutorial quote: Whether you need to run some legacy corporate application, or just want to play some of those old classic DOS games, it's easy to get going.

I've done this on a Slackware 9.1 Linux system with a 2.4.22 kernel, running KDE 3.1.4. The process should be very similar for most reasonably recent Linux distros.
Linux

Building a Linux Cluster, Part 3: How To Get Started

Post date: April 25, 2005, 14:04 Category: Network Views: 3071 Comments
Tutorial quote: In the previous two articles in this series, we examined some of the whys and whats of building Linux clusters. This article concludes our series by concentrating on the hows of cluster building. We've seen that a clustered approach to certain computing solutions can save lots of money in hardware and support costs. Now our job is to produce a method of building clusters that's repeatable and predictable—we don't want to give back our hard-won savings in project cost overruns.
Linux

Splash image in GRUB

Post date: April 24, 2005, 18:04 Category: Software Views: 3067 Comments
Tutorial quote: The splash image is the image shown in the background when GRUB (the GRand Unified Bootloader) is displaying the list of operating systems you can boot. All you need to customize it is the GIMP and gzip.
Linux

NPTL vs. NPGT vs. LinuxThreads

Post date: April 24, 2005, 09:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3520 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ulrich Drepper recently offered some interesting benchmark results, comparing the time it takes to create and destroy threads with different threading models under various conditions. The tests were run using a 2.5.37 development kernel, comparing LinuxThreads, NGPT 2.0.2 and NPTL 0.1.
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