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Easy Linux Network Backup

Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 3325 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you use Linux, you already have access to extremely powerful tools for creating custom backup solutions. The solutions in this article can help you perform simple to more advanced and secure network backups using open source tools that are part of nearly every Linux distribution.
Linux

How Linux boots: Runlevels and init

Post date: April 12, 2005, 23:04 Category: System Views: 3288 Comments
Tutorial quote: Identifying each stage of the boot process is invaluable in fixing boot problems and understanding the system as a whole.
Linux

Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables for Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3288 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're a programmer who's become fed up with software bloat, then may you find herein the perfect antidote.

This document explores methods for squeezing excess bytes out of simple programs. (Of course, the more practical purpose of this document is to describe a few of the inner workings of the ELF file format and the Linux operating system. But hopefully you can also learn something about how to make really teensy ELF executables in the process.)

Please note that the information and examples given here are, for the most part, specific to ELF executables on a Linux platform running under an Intel-386 architecture. I imagine that a good bit of the information is applicable to other ELF-based Unices, but my experiences with such are too limited for me to say with certainty.

The assembly code that appears in this document is written for use with Nasm. (Besides being more appropriate for our needs, Nasm's syntax beats the hell out of AT&T syntax for anyone who learned x86 assembly language before learning to use Gas.) Nasm is freely available and extremely portable; see http://nasm.sourceforge.net/.

Please also note that if you aren't a little bit familiar with assembly code, you may find parts of this document sort of hard to follow.
Linux

Today's Linux screen capture technology

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 3093 Comments
Tutorial quote: "I'd like you to help me find out about video screen captures," said one of my editors a while back. "Sure, let me see what's available," I replied. He pointed me to a couple of Web sites to get me started, and here I am a few weeks later ready to share my findings. I'll discuss ways that you can make video clips in Linux, talk about their applications and shortcomings. I'll also cover suitable ways to view your masterpieces once they're recorded.

Video screen captures are useful for jobs like application training, computer instruction, or product demos. An example would be the little one-minute video I set up for my wife. She kept forgetting how to start up Mozilla Mail on her Windows 98 machine. I captured the mouse clicks and screen changes (in real time) as I ran through the process, saving it to a Macromedia Flash file. I then created a little Web page on one of my Apache servers, that described how to start Mozilla Mail and included a link to the Flash file. Instead of asking me how to do it, she can now just click on the video tutorial.
Linux

Tuning up your IDE hard disks using hdparm

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Optimizing Views: 3760 Comments
Tutorial quote: hdparm is a tool for altering various parameters associated with IDE drives (Not SCSI). This involves things like the block prefetch, the DMA/PIO modes,
and a number of other things.

I'm writing this mini-how-to to help people get more from their system. People often complain that Linux is a bit slow for them (which it can be) I haven't seen such a post recently, but I know on TechIMO at least we always used to be talking people through using hdparm.
Linux

How to play DVDs on any x86 GNU/Linux distro

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Multimedia Views: 3537 Comments
Tutorial quote: My folks recently bought and sent me two DVDs, but the only DVD player I have is in my Linux-based computer. Using the free software application MPlayer, I was able to watch my videos. I'll walk you through the easy steps required.
Linux

Linux Web Filtering in 7 steps

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 4651 Comments
Tutorial quote: How to install a transparent Squid proxy server with real-time HTTP virus scanning on Mandrake 10.0 using DansGuardian and ClamAV?

People quickly and easily access volumes of research on the Internet and correspond with a mouse click. For more and more companies, content filtering is part of the large battle to combat all kinds of online threats, including hackers, worms and viruses. Linux content filtering allows administrators to configure and manage Internet access across the entire network and to block unwanted Web content like pornography, shopping Web sites, games and gambling.

This guide contains all the necessary information for installing and understanding the architectural layout of the implementation. It was written with the assumption that you understand how to install programs and have a basic understanding of Linux Mandrake. This includes installing Linux Mandrake and RPM packages, editing files, making directories, compiling software and understanding general UNIX commands. This guide doesn’t explain how to use or configure Squid, DansGuardian and ClamAV but information on where to obtain this information can be found in the “Additional information” section.
Linux

Keep an Eye on Your Linux Systems with Netstat

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 2724 Comments
Tutorial quote: Two of the fundamental aspects of Linux system security and troubleshooting are knowing what services are running, and what connections and services are available. We're all familiar with ps for viewing active services. netstat goes a couple of steps further, and displays all available connections, services, and their status.
Linux

Setting the Clock on Linux

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: System Views: 2847 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are 3 protocols dealing with time: NTP (port 123), Time (port 37), and Daytime (port 13). If you're connecting to the Internet periodically, then synchronizing your clock when you dial up or from crontab is good enough. This applies also to most Linux machines at home or at work, even if they are connected all the time. Here is a short tutorial on how to set your clock using these 3 protocols.
Linux

Linux Security HOWTO

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Security Views: 3449 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document is a general overview of security issues that face the administrator of Linux systems. It covers general security philosophy and a number of specific examples of how to better secure your Linux system from intruders. Also included are pointers to security-related material and programs.
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