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Tuning and Optimizing Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Oracle 9i and 10g Databases

Post date: December 19, 2007, 06:12 Category: Optimizing Views: 8104 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article is a step by step guide for tuning and optimizing Red Hat Enterprise Linux on x86 and x86-64 platforms running Oracle 9i (32bit/64bit) and Oracle 10g (32bit/64bit) standalone and RAC databases. This guide covers Red Hat Enterprise Linux Advanced Server 3 and 4 and the older version 2.1.

How to set up a home DNS server

Post date: December 17, 2006, 17:12 Category: Network Views: 8873 Comments
Tutorial quote: In the first part of this series on the Domain Name System (DNS), we set up a caching nameserver that allowed our clients to take advantage of faster network operations by caching frequently requested DNS queries. In this article, we will extend our caching nameserver to a master nameserver that is responsible for managing the authoritative information for our internal client hostnames.

Ruby on Rails on Red Hat

Post date: November 27, 2006, 07:11 Category: Network Views: 5061 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ruby on Rails is an open source freely available web development framework. It's been quite popular--it won a Jolt "Web Development Tools" award last year, and some prominent Java developers have publically switched to Ruby on Rails. The buzz surrounding Rails is quite impressive--particularly when you consider that Rails had no Fortune 500 company to market it, unlike .NET or Java.

Rails is a Model View Controller (MVC) framework. As you can imagine from the name, applications written using Model View Controller frameworks have three main components: a model, which represents the data and associated logic; the view, which represents how a user interacts with the application; and the controller, which contains all of the business logic that drives the application. This is an artificial distinction, of course, but it is a powerful one.

You'll need Apache 2.0+ and MySQL installed on your Red Hat Linux computer to run these examples.

NIST Publically-Released Red Hat Enterprise Linux Benchmark

Post date: October 21, 2006, 04:10 Category: Benchmarks Views: 5610 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Benchmark is a compilation of security configuration actions and settings that "harden" Red Hat Linux operating systems. It is a CIS Level-I benchmark: the prudent level of minimum due care for operating system security. This benchmark was developed and tested on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) including RHEL 2.1, RHEL 3.0, and Fedora Core 1, 2, & 3. It is likely to work for other Linux distributions - especially Red Hat and Fedora derivatives - as well.

How to set up a home web server

Post date: September 21, 2006, 21:09 Category: Network Views: 8210 Comments
Tutorial quote: It seems like everybody's blogging and sharing digital photos online. This booming hobby (and business) sends many people to paid hosting companies to share their thoughts and images. Though many companies are reliable and inexpensive, with a little work and some relatively cheap hardware you can host your own files, save some money, and have complete control over what services are available and how your content is displayed.

RH 9.0 Apache 2.0.47 + Tomcat 4.1.27 HOWTO

Post date: April 9, 2006, 14:04 Category: Software Views: 5127 Comments
Tutorial quote: Building an Apache HTTP + Tomcat environment is five major steps.

Tips & tricks: Performance tuning

Post date: November 26, 2005, 00:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 7323 Comments
Tutorial quote: Advanced tips on optimizing your Red Hat server.

Creating desktop profiles with Sabayon

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Desktop Views: 5070 Comments
Tutorial quote: Instead of creating a new desktop setup every single time a new user comes along, it would be much easier to create some templates. If only there were an easy way to make and manage these templates.

Fortunately, we are not the first to ponder this issue. The creators of Sabayon decided to tackle the lack of a good desktop setting management tool. With Sabayon, they created an application that handles these problems and more.

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 6173 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.

Getting back my GNOME desktop from the clutches of the GNOME configuration system

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Desktop Views: 4825 Comments
Tutorial quote: My problem: as a user I managed to lock myself out of my GNOME desktop though a careless setting of Preferences-> Resolution.

In determining my solution I learned some key lessons about the GNOME configuration system.
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