Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Unix clones tutorials
Unix+clones

Chkrootkit Portsentry Howto

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Security Views: 2816 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install chkrootkit and portsentry. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems.

Chkrootkit "is a tool to locally check for signs of a rootkit" (from http://www.chkrootkit.org).

"The Sentry tools provide host-level security services for the Unix platform. PortSentry, Logcheck/LogSentry, and HostSentry protect against portscans, automate log file auditing, and detect suspicious login activity on a continuous basis" (from http://sourceforge.net/projects/sentrytools/).

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
Unix+clones

Setting Up Samba 3.x

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 2710 Comments
Tutorial quote: Recently I got the opportunity to setup a new lab for a small school. The server runs Linux and the workstations run WindowsXP. There are 3 levels of access on the workstations (admin, teacher, and student) and security on the workstations is based on Windows policies applied at logon.
Unix+clones

The lost art of named pipes

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: System Views: 2817 Comments
Tutorial quote: A "named pipe" -- also known as a FIFO (First In, First Out) or just fifo -- is an inter-process communication mechanism that makes use of the filesystem to allow two processes to communicate with each other. In particular, it allows one of these to open one end of the pipe as a reader, and the other to open it as a writer. Let's take a look at the FIFO and how you can use it.
Unix+clones

Providing FTP Services with PureFTPd

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Network Views: 2405 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you work around computers for any length of time you'll probably run into an FTP server. FTP stands for File Transfer Protocol and FTP servers are used to do just that, transfer files. FTP has been around for a long time, much longer than P2P programs, or the World Wide Web, in its day it was the primary method of sharing files with others on the Internet, and it remains very popular even today. This tutorial will cover the installation and setup of an FTP server using PureFTPd.
Unix+clones

How to Block Ads With Adzap

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Network Views: 2797 Comments
Tutorial quote: For some time at my workplace we've been running an ad-zapping service on our web proxy. This page documents how it works, how to use it yourself, how to join the mailing list for updates of the pattern file, and the weirdnesses of our local setup (which you need not duplicate yourself).
Unix+clones

Using network transfer protocols

Post date: April 15, 2005, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 2177 Comments
Tutorial quote: Let's face it, most of us are in a rut when it comes to moving our files around. We learned how to use a simple FTP client years ago, and maybe even updated to a GUI FTP client when we were feeling particularly adventurous. There are actually a wealth of tools available for transferring files, and some of them perform automation functions that can easily assist your business in building site mirrors, synchronizing directory contents, and more.

Keep in mind that for many of the tools covered here, there's only really room to skim through their features. Some, such as wget and rsync, are full of useful capabilities for those brave enough to read their man pages and experiment.
Unix+clones

Have a Bash With This Linux Shell

Post date: April 15, 2005, 05:04 Category: Programming Views: 3128 Comments
Tutorial quote: Any Linux administrator who wishes to remain sane relies heavily on scripting to automate routine tasks, customize jobs, and build the plumbing that connects the different utilities that make a Linux system run smoothly. The Linux world is chock-full of scripting languages: Perl, Python, PHP, Scheme, Tcl, Tk, Ruby, Forth, Smalltalk, Eiffel, and doubtless many more. To get the column started, we'll look at shell scripting with Bash, and scripting with Python and Perl.
Unix+clones

Get More Out of Your Pipe with Apache and mod_gzip

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 2475 Comments
Tutorial quote: Some Web sites seem like they are designed to annoy and alienate visitors. Teeny tiny fixed fonts, weirdo fixed page widths, ad servers on Mars, and the content won't load until the ads do, and all kinds of dynamic jiggery-pokery that does everything but quickly deliver a nice, readable page.

Webmasters who are serious about running high-performance Web servers, and who want pleased and delighted visitors, have a great tool in Apache 1.3's mod_gzip. mod_gzip compresses pages on the fly, reducing their size considerably. Depending on the types of files served, you'll see size reductions ranging from 20%- 80%, and a nice increase in server efficiency. Nothing is needed on the client side, except sane modern Web browsers like Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, Galeon, and Konqueror. Mozilla, Firefox, and Opera are nice cross-platform browsers with all kinds of neat features, so don't be afraid to standardize on one of them.
Unix+clones

Using Impress-ive Charts In OpenOffice.org

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Software Views: 2357 Comments
Tutorial quote: Anybody that does presentations will someday need to use a chart. A manager needs charts to show production numbers and profits. A scientist or trainer needs charts to show facts, figures and results. A sales seminar leader needs charts to explain sales figures. So, what's involved in getting these nifty things into your OpenOffice.org-based slide show?

The process of integrating charts into your Impress slide show is fairly straightforward, although it does involve a few steps and two different components of OpenOffice.org.
Unix+clones

OpenOffice Tips: Writer, Calc and Impress

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Software Views: 2480 Comments
Tutorial quote: Making the switch from Microsoft Office to OpenOffice can save you a lot of money on licensing fees, and it isn't difficult--most people get used to the changes quickly. But if you've been using MS Office for the best part of a decade and learned a few of its tricks along the way, you may find yourself baffled about how to do certain tasks in OpenOffice. Here are a few tips on using Writer, Calc and Impress.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink