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Hardware related tutorials

Linux

How to suspend and hibernate a laptop under Linux

Post date: June 7, 2006, 20:06 Category: Hardware Views: 4649 Comments
Tutorial quote: Many people prefer working with laptops instead of desktops for the flexibility they offer. Some of them would also like to switch to a free and open source operating system like GNU/Linux and have their laptop do all the things that proprietary OSes offer, such as suspending their laptops. Several distributions try to make this work out of the box, but knowing what's under the hood always comes in handy, particularly when something goes wrong and needs fixing. Let's take a look at how to suspend and hibernate your laptop under Linux.
Ubuntu

Insights for a quick and easy Ubuntu printer installation

Post date: June 4, 2006, 18:06 Category: Hardware Views: 7036 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ubuntu makes printing reasonably easy and straightforward. This brief article is for those who need a specific and encouraging step-by-step guide. I hope that this article will not only ensure that you print with ease, but that you have every reason to enjoy a productive GNU/Linux desktop.

Before you begin the installation steps below, connect your printer/s. You need to do this prior to turning your system on. This helps to ensure Ubuntu recognizes how the printer is connected to the system, and it allows Ubuntu to identify the specific printer port.

Please don’t be dismayed if you plug in your printer and it’s not immediately recognized. I assure you that Ubuntu recognizes the printer. However, you will first need to configure the printer as an available device so other programs can use it.

The Ubuntu Printing Configuration Tool is used to accomplish this. For my example I will use an HP Deskjet printer connected to the Ubuntu system via a USB cable. However, these steps will also apply to printers that connect via a direct or Parallel cable.
Linux

Solving the ugly key problem

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Hardware Views: 3347 Comments
Tutorial quote: You have one of the finest operating systems running on you computer and you are pleased with the setup of your desktop. Proud and happy as you are you look at your computer. You look down to the keyboard and what are those ugly keys in the lower row of your keyboard? Win-keys??!

Even though you might not be using those keys it is still annoying and stressful to see them. How can we replace them by penguin keys?

This short tip presents two solutions for this problem.
Linux

LCD displays easy to use and easy to build

Post date: May 24, 2005, 18:05 Category: Hardware Views: 3193 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article presents now the "basic" model: LCD display and 2 buttons; simple and easy to build for everybody.

Lcdproc used to be at the very beginning a program to display some statistics (cpu load, uptime, time, ...) on an external LCD display. Over time it has however evolved into a much more generic solution. Today the lcdproc package contains LCDd, a generic server and LCD driver, plus many clients. One of those clients is still the actual executable called lcdproc which still shows server statistics however there are also others. This client server architecture has the big advantage that you do not need to write your client in a specific language. You just need to use the simple ascii protocol between client and server.
NetBSD

Installling NetBSD: Tales of Rescuing Old Hardware

Post date: May 8, 2005, 21:05 Category: Hardware Views: 6239 Comments
Tutorial quote: Tutorial explains how to install NetBSD on old Toshiba T2130CS using COM port.
Gentoo

Logitech quickcam on 2.6.x kernel

Post date: April 25, 2005, 23:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3049 Comments
Tutorial quote: This short tutorial explains how to get your Logitech Quickcam to work under 2.6.x kernel.
Linux

USB Flash Memory HOWTO

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Hardware Views: 2961 Comments
Tutorial quote: The purpose of this document is to describe procedures for implementing USB flash memory devices (memory sticks) on Linux.
Gentoo

EVMS Howto for Gentoo Linux

Post date: April 15, 2005, 04:04 Category: Hardware Views: 4464 Comments
Tutorial quote: EVMS stands for Enterprise Volume Management System. It's a all-in-one utility written by IBM to manage disk partitions, logical volumes, software RAID and even filesystems.

It does everything from installing the partition table to mounting volumes, fscking and resizing them. It has a plugin mechanism which allow a user to extend EVMS with external drivers.
Linux

The Serial Console

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3097 Comments
Tutorial quote: In these modern times, a hardworking admin might be tempted to turn her back on the Old Ways, and indulge in increasingly exotic methods of interfacing with servers: SSH over ethernet, USB, Firewire, wireless, infrared, KVM switches, VNC, VPN... next stop: direct neural implants.

There's one old timer that still has useful place in the admin's tool kit: the serial console. Sure, it's slow and funky. But there are times it can be a real lifesaver. When nothing else works, it's a direct pipeline into your system. It's simple and cheap. You don't need to install drivers or expansion cards, it's just there.

Administration via serial console is common in data centers. Just imagine the nightmare of trying to connect all those rack units to keyboards and displays. The cabling can be extended to a nice comfortable ops center (well, an ops center, anyway). (This Lantronix Console Manager is an example of the type of device used to administer these.)

There are a number of ways to make the physical connection. You can connect an external modem--the kind us old timers fondly refer to as "real" modems--and do remote administration via dialup. It couldn't be any simpler, just dial direct. Or grab a null modem cable, connect to a laptop or a nearby workstation, and you have an instant terminal.
Linux

Connecting to a Wireless LAN with Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 13, 2005, 19:04 Category: Hardware Views: 3589 Comments
Tutorial quote: In Part 1 we reviewed hardware options, which wireless utilities should be present, how to use Windows drivers, and how to be open to connect to any available wireless access point. Today we'll cover configurations on Red Hat- and Debian-type systems, basic security, and hardware discovery.

Wireless connectivity can be rather overly friendly, allowing connections from anyone. This howto assumes you have a wireless access point on a LAN, which can be all wireless or mixed wired and wireless. You don't want it wide open to just any random person with a desire to snoop on your network or "borrow" your bandwidth, but you want some access controls and security. Your access point should have a unique SSID (service set identifier), WEP (wireless equivalent privacy) or WPA/WPA2 (Wi-fi protected access) set up and working, and either a DHCP server or a pool of assigned IP addresses for clients.
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