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System related tutorials

Debian

Splitting updatedb into daily and weekly

Post date: April 21, 2006, 12:04 Category: System Views: 2505 Comments
Tutorial quote: We all appreciate the locate command when we are such in a hurry we cannot afford a full and in-elegant find. What we like a little less, though, is the updatedb script consuming up all our disk bandwidth at each boot, summoned by anacron.

Of course, this is only the case if you are running a "desktop" machine: since you turn it on when you need to do some work, then you long for a way to shorten the period of reduced usability forced by updatedb.

Inversely, if you run a server that never goes down, and you successfully schedule your updatedb tasks late at night, then this article is not for you.
Linux

Howto install the base Linux system onto a USB thumbdrive with the root partition encrypted

Post date: April 20, 2006, 12:04 Category: System Views: 2766 Comments
Tutorial quote: This howto will explain how to install a very basesystem onto a USB thumbdrive with the root partition encrypted. It includes support for cryptsetup-luks, and udev.
FreeBSD

Building a FreeBSD Build System

Post date: April 15, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 3584 Comments
Tutorial quote: When you finish this article, you will have an unbeatable update system. Even mergemaster will work faster. You will have an update system in which a machine update/upgrade will take less than 10 minutes.
Linux

Removing A User

Post date: April 8, 2006, 00:04 Category: System Views: 3930 Comments
Tutorial quote: Employee turnover in most organizations runs high. So unless you run a small shop with a stable user base, you need to learn how to clean up after an employee leaves. Too many so-called system administrators do not understand the stakes involved when they manage users. Disgruntled former employees can often cause significant trouble for a company by gaining access to the network.

To remove a user, you need to learn to manage all of his or her files, mailboxes, mail aliases, print jobs, recurring –(automatic) personal processes such as the backing up of data or remote syncing of directories, and other references to the user. It is a good idea at first to disable the account in /etc/passwd, after which you can search for the user's files and other references. Once all traces of the user have been cleaned up, you can remove the user completely—but if you remove the entry from /etc/passwd while these other references exist, you have a harder time referring to them .

When you remove a user, it's a good idea to follow a pre-determined course of action so you don't forget any important steps; it may even be a good idea to make a checklist so that you have a routine. Following, you will find several items requiring attention.
Debian

Running scripts after a reboot for non-root users

Post date: April 5, 2006, 01:04 Category: System Views: 2366 Comments
Tutorial quote: There is an alternative way of adding entries to your crontab file, using shortcuts. The shortcuts allow you to make entries that will match at particular times.
FreeBSD

Setting up Linux compatibility on FreeBSD 6

Post date: April 3, 2006, 06:04 Category: System Views: 3550 Comments
Tutorial quote: As a FreeBSD desktop user I occasionally feel left out when it comes to the availability of applications, particularly desktop applications or binary-only browser plugins produced by commercial closed source vendors. Sometimes a good alternative lurks in the vast FreeBSD ports collection, but not always. The version available may lag a couple of revisions behind what I need, or the port might exclude my particular architecture. Fortunately, FreeBSD can run binaries and shared libraries that have been compiled for Linux and other Unix ABIs (such as SVR4 and SCO).

In this article I will cover the steps necessary to enable and configure Linux binary compatibility on FreeBSD 6. I'll also share a couple of my own experiences with getting some well-known desktop Linux applications to run on FreeBSD 6.
Linux

HOWTO backup your linux system using bash, tar and netcat

Post date: April 2, 2006, 22:04 Category: System Views: 2719 Comments
Tutorial quote: I recently ran into the problem of not having enough hard drive space on my slackware linux laptop, but was lucky enough to have a much bigger drive sitting around from before and wanted a way to perform a hassle free seamless upgrade. i had this idea and it worked pretty well so i thought i would share it since i think it's pretty cool and only requires the use of two tools that should be included with all distributions.
Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0 Setup For Debian

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 2657 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.
FreeBSD

Upgrading FreeBSD

Post date: April 1, 2006, 05:04 Category: System Views: 3522 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document started as a follow up to The Ultimate Multimedia Server Guide and how to go about keeping your server up to date and patched with the latest O/S patches and security patches. The other reason for this document was to try and create an easy to follow update guide for the not so Unix savvy users that visit my website from time to time. My first time trying to upgrade FreeBSD from sources went well but trying to understand and piece together all the other documentation was more of a daunting task than actually upgrading.
Debian

Building A Virtual Server (VPS) With Debian 3.1 (Sarge) And OpenVZ

Post date: March 20, 2006, 20:03 Category: System Views: 3174 Comments
Tutorial quote: In this HowTo I will describe the steps to be taken to prepare a server for OpenVZ virtual machines on Debian 3.1 (Sarge) 32Bit Linux. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers. The OpenVZ kernal patch is licensed under the GPL license, and the user-level tools are under the QPL license.
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