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System related tutorials

Linux

Back Up/Restore Hard Drives And Partitions With Ghost4Linux

Post date: January 11, 2007, 19:01 Category: System Views: 3894 Comments
Tutorial quote: This tutorial shows how you can back up and restore hard drives and partitions with Ghost4Linux. Ghost4Linux is a Linux Live-CD that you insert into your computer; it contains hard disk and partition imaging and cloning tools similar to Norton Ghost. The created images are compressed and transferred to an FTP server instead of cloning locally.
Linux

How To Resize ext3 Partitions Without Losing Data

Post date: January 9, 2007, 20:01 Category: System Views: 4680 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article is about resizing ext3 partitions without losing data. It shows how to shrink and enlarge existing ext3 partitions and how to merge two ext3 partitions. This can be quite useful if you do not use LVM and you realize that your existing partitioning does not meet your actual needs anymore.
Linux

Tweakin' your Bash Prompt

Post date: January 6, 2007, 22:01 Category: System Views: 4126 Comments
Tutorial quote: A friendly companion to the Bash-Prompt HOWTO, including a new trick to make the prompt change color dynamically based on your log-in. In the process, the overview could be handy in doing other Bash prompt tricks.
Linux

How the One-Liner For-Loop in Bash Goes

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 3297 Comments
Tutorial quote: A mini-guide to one of the coolest tricks at the Bash command line - performing the same operation on a whole group of files at once using the "for-do-done" loop syntax.
Linux

Chmod Squad: HOWTO Use Linux File Permissions

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 3635 Comments
Tutorial quote: A complete new user's guide to the Linux file permission system, with examples. Be mystified no more by cryptic file permission bits.
Linux

What's up, Doc? A guide to Linux Documentation

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 2720 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you're new to Linux, you've probably been told to read the manual, but what good is that advice if you don't know where the manuals are or how to use them? Here, in one place, is complate instructions on how to find and navigate the common Linux documentation systems, including man, info, READMEs, HOWTOs, HTML, PDF/PS, DocBook, Gnome and KDE help system, and command-line option conventions. The guide I wish I'd had when I was new to Linux!
Linux

Directory Directions...a Guide to the Linux File System

Post date: January 6, 2007, 21:01 Category: System Views: 3144 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ever wonder what those short Linux file system folders mean and what they contain? A little tour with easy directions explains all here.
Debian

Removing Unwanted Startup Debian Files or Services

Post date: January 5, 2007, 07:01 Category: System Views: 3381 Comments
Tutorial quote: Under Debian Linux ( and most other distros) startup files are stored in /etc/init.d/ directory and symbolic linked between /etc/rcX.d/ directory exists. Debian Linux (Red Hat/ Fedora) uses System V initialization scripts to start services at boot time from /etc/rcX.d/ directory. Debian Linux comes with different utilities to remove unwanted startup files.
Debian

SSH your Debian servers without password

Post date: December 29, 2006, 20:12 Category: System Views: 2955 Comments
Tutorial quote: Secure Shell is a program to log into another computer over a network, to execute commands in a remote machine, and to move files from one machine to another. It provides strong authentication and secure communications over unsecure channels. It is intended as a replacement for telnet, rlogin, rsh, and rcp. For SSH2, there is a replacement for FTP: sftp.This might be useful if you are trying to connect everytime to your server remotely.
Debian

OpenVZ On Debian Etch For Webservers

Post date: December 26, 2006, 21:12 Category: System Views: 3164 Comments
Tutorial quote: Virtualization is a good practice for servers, since it makes things more secure, scalable, replacable, and replicable, all this at the cost of little added complexity. This guide was written during an install of a Supermicro machine with two dual-core opterons (64-bit), two identical disks (for RAID) and a load of memory. Why OpenVZ and not XEN or the recent KVM kernel module? Well, XEN is not very stable for 64-bit architectures (yet), and it comes with quite a bit of overhead (every VM runs its own kernel) due to its complexity. KVM is very simple but restricts you to run a kernel as one process, so the VM cannot benefit from multi core systems.
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