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Linux

Use Webmin for Linux Administration

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Software Views: 4066 Comments
Tutorial quote: Administering Linux and Unix-based servers does not need to be the scourge of your work day. With a handy tool called Webmin as part of your arsenal, you can regain complete control of your servers via the Web browser.
Unix+clones

How to create OpenOffice.org macros and automation

Post date: April 13, 2005, 00:04 Category: Software Views: 3022 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are times when you need to perform some task over and over, or when a task is complex enough that doing it manually makes it hard to get it right. OpenOffice.org macros allow you to save a sequence of operations with a single name so you can do the same thing repeatedly. Automation is a first cousin to macros. It lets another application control OOo and make things happen without user intervention.
SmoothWall

Install SquidGuard on Smoothwall

Post date: April 12, 2005, 18:04 Category: Software Views: 12006 Comments
Tutorial quote: squidGuard describes itself as: "An ultrafast and free filter, redirector and access controller for Squid". In my experience, it is the ideal web filter for use with Smoothwall and IpCop since it is lightweight and easy to set up. I use it on an i486, 33Mhz system with 18Mb of Ram and 500Mb of hard drive - and while there is a minor performance hit, the hit is not significant.

This simple how-to describes the steps I took to install squidGuard on my system - it should work for yours too.
Linux

Grub From the Ground Up

Post date: April 12, 2005, 17:04 Category: Software Views: 3464 Comments
Tutorial quote: Grub is a world-class boot loader with insufficient documentation. In many ways it blows the doors of LILO. For instance, it's MUCH easier to use Knoppix to rebuild a grub boot loader than to rebuild a LILO boot loader. However, until you're comfortable with grub, it might seem just the opposite. All too often grub dumps you at a grub> prompt with no hint of what you should do. You might have heard that a successful reboot is just three commands away, but which commands? The state of grub's documentation is such that you can't figure it out unless you already know grub.

That catch 22 is the very purpose of this document. This document will to give you enough grub expertise that you can create a grub boot floppy on a working machine with grub installed (not necessarily as the bootloader, just installed), and use that floppy to bust back into a Linux machine with a blown bootloader, and then use that floppy to actually install grub as the bootloader.

This document does not discuss using grub to boot or dual boot Windows, mach, BSD, or other non-Linux operating systems. I might write on that subject later. But in the meantime, once you're familiar with the principles and practices of grub, given some study of existing documentation you'll probably be able to use grub to boot non-Linux operating systems.
Unix+clones

How to Set Up a Jabber Server

Post date: April 12, 2005, 16:04 Category: Software Views: 7193 Comments
Tutorial quote: Unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years, you must have heard about instant messaging and how it has changed the world of communications over the Internet. According to http://www.webopedia.com, Instant Messaging (IM) is a service that alerts users when their friends or colleagues are on line and allows them to communicate in real time through private online chat areas. Two of the most popular IM services are AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) and MSN Messenger. Unfortunately, most of the publicly available servers use proprietary protocols that only allow you to communicate with users on the same system. These systems are not compatible with each other and can't be accessed from other clients.

Jabber is an open source implementation of the IM server that aims to change this. It uses streaming XML protocols that are free, open, and public. These protocols have been formalized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) as the approved instant messaging and presence technology under the name of XMPP. The first Jabber technologies were developed in 1998 by Jeremie Miller and is now used on thousands of servers world-wide to enable millions of users to communicate with each other.

The biggest advantage of the Jabber server when compared with commercial IM servers is that, since it is open source, anyone can run a Jabber server and it can be restricted to a specific community like a company work force or a group of friends. In this article, I will document the steps I took to set up a Jabber server and how I managed to overcome the difficulties I faced. Hopefully this will make it easier for you to set up your own Jabber server.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink