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Network related tutorials

Linux

Traffic shaping and bandwidth management

Post date: April 17, 2005, 10:04 Category: Network Views: 4771 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article is from the perspective of a small network, possibly a couple of people sharing one connection. It will explain traffic shaping and bandwidth management in general and with linx. It (sort of) walks through building a traffic shaping router.
Linux

Port Knocking

Post date: April 16, 2005, 10:04 Category: Network Views: 3415 Comments
Tutorial quote: Firewall administrators are challenged to balance flexibility and security when designing a comprehensive rule set. A firewall should provide protection against malfeasants, while allowing trusted users to connect. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to filter out the bad guys, because filtering on the basis of IP addresses and ports does not distinguish connecting users. Bad guys can and do come from trusted IP addresses. Open ports remain a necessary vulnerability: they allow connections to applications but also may turn into open doors for attack. This article presents a new security system, termed port knocking, in which trusted users manipulate firewall rules by transmitting information across closed ports.
Fedora+Core

VNC (Virtual Network Computing) 101

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 4128 Comments
Tutorial quote: VNC stands for Virtual Network Computing. It is remote control software which allows you to view and interact with one computer (the "server") using a simple program (the "viewer") on another computer anywhere on the Internet. The two computers don't even have to be the same type, so for example you can use VNC to view an office Linux machine on your Windows PC at home. VNC is freely and publicly available and is in widespread active use by millions throughout industry, academia and privately.
Debian

Setup an IPv6 Masquerade Box Under Debian Through IPv4

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 3110 Comments
Tutorial quote: Configuring IPv6 (over IPv4) under Debian, quite frankly, couldn't be easier. I had a somewhat difficult time in setting it up myself, but that was only because the guides I'd seen on the WWW were designed for operating systems such as FreeBSD. Thus, I have decided to write this document to promote IPv6, and to relieve the frustration of those looking for a no-fuss way to quickly configure IPv6 under Debian.
Unix+clones

SpamAssassin, ClamAV and Procmail Howto

Post date: April 16, 2005, 00:04 Category: Network Views: 3513 Comments
Tutorial quote: This document describes how to install SpamAssassin (for filtering SPAM) and ClamAV (for filtering viruses, trojans, worms, etc.) and how to invoke them by using procmail recipes. It is suitable for scenarios where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to local users. It should work (maybe with slight changes concerning paths etc.) on all *nix operating systems. I tested it on Debian Woody so far.

In the end you will have a system where Sendmail or Postfix deliver emails to a local user; the emails are passed to procmail which invokes SpamAssassin and ClamAV in order to filter the emails before they arrive in the user's inbox. However, the installation of Sendmail and Postfix are not covered in this document.

This howto is meant as a practical guide.
Unix+clones

Setting Up Samba 3.x

Post date: April 15, 2005, 23:04 Category: Network Views: 3127 Comments
Tutorial quote: Recently I got the opportunity to setup a new lab for a small school. The server runs Linux and the workstations run WindowsXP. There are 3 levels of access on the workstations (admin, teacher, and student) and security on the workstations is based on Windows policies applied at logon.
Unix+clones

Providing FTP Services with PureFTPd

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Network Views: 2804 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you work around computers for any length of time you'll probably run into an FTP server. FTP stands for File Transfer Protocol and FTP servers are used to do just that, transfer files. FTP has been around for a long time, much longer than P2P programs, or the World Wide Web, in its day it was the primary method of sharing files with others on the Internet, and it remains very popular even today. This tutorial will cover the installation and setup of an FTP server using PureFTPd.
Unix+clones

How to Block Ads With Adzap

Post date: April 15, 2005, 21:04 Category: Network Views: 3380 Comments
Tutorial quote: For some time at my workplace we've been running an ad-zapping service on our web proxy. This page documents how it works, how to use it yourself, how to join the mailing list for updates of the pattern file, and the weirdnesses of our local setup (which you need not duplicate yourself).
Unix+clones

Using network transfer protocols

Post date: April 15, 2005, 18:04 Category: Network Views: 2605 Comments
Tutorial quote: Let's face it, most of us are in a rut when it comes to moving our files around. We learned how to use a simple FTP client years ago, and maybe even updated to a GUI FTP client when we were feeling particularly adventurous. There are actually a wealth of tools available for transferring files, and some of them perform automation functions that can easily assist your business in building site mirrors, synchronizing directory contents, and more.

Keep in mind that for many of the tools covered here, there's only really room to skim through their features. Some, such as wget and rsync, are full of useful capabilities for those brave enough to read their man pages and experiment.
Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 2

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 4035 Comments
Tutorial quote: Welcome back! In Part 1 we learned basic concepts of LDAP and the uses for an LDAP server. Today we'll install and configure an OpenLDAP directory.

A quick note before we get started: this is LDAP 101. We are not installing any kind of encryption or strong authentication; we'll get to that in part 3. In my experience, learning LDAP in small chunks works best. (Then again, perhaps I'm just a bit dim.) So sit back, strap in, and keep your fingers away from the training wheels.

"The wise sysadmin will consult the documentation for their distro; it's quite possible that OpenLDAP will be packaged and ready to go in a pleasing manner (or ready to go in an odd manner--you never know). I'm all for easy--if your particular distribution provides an easy way, use it. RPMs can also be obtained from rpmfind.net, which thoughtfully lists all the required additional packages.

"Debian of course goes its own merry way. apt-get does the job just fine; the tricky bit is finding out the package names. Debian users want ldap-utils; slapd, which is OpenLDAP; and libdb4.1, to get the Sleepycat DB. These three components are enough to get you up and running. apt-get will walk you through a minimal configuration and will automatically start up slapd, the LDAP server daemon.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink