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Network related tutorials

Linux

Building an LDAP Server on Linux, Part 1

Post date: April 15, 2005, 17:04 Category: Network Views: 3081 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your network is growing in size and complexity. It's taking on a life of its own, spreading and growing and absorbing everything in its path. You're tearing your hair out trying to keep track, and your users have somehow discovered your secret phone number and are pestering you with endless questions and demands--where do I find this; I don't want to keep track of a dozen different passwords; nothing works like it should.

Of several possible solutions, consider two: 1) find a new hiding place, or 2) implement an LDAP server. While finding a new hiding place might sound ideal, it's an option we're going to have to save for a future article. This series will instead explain what LDAP is good for, detail how to build an LDAP server, and cover what you can do with it.
Unix+clones

Get More Out of Your Pipe with Apache and mod_gzip

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 2965 Comments
Tutorial quote: Some Web sites seem like they are designed to annoy and alienate visitors. Teeny tiny fixed fonts, weirdo fixed page widths, ad servers on Mars, and the content won't load until the ads do, and all kinds of dynamic jiggery-pokery that does everything but quickly deliver a nice, readable page.

Webmasters who are serious about running high-performance Web servers, and who want pleased and delighted visitors, have a great tool in Apache 1.3's mod_gzip. mod_gzip compresses pages on the fly, reducing their size considerably. Depending on the types of files served, you'll see size reductions ranging from 20%- 80%, and a nice increase in server efficiency. Nothing is needed on the client side, except sane modern Web browsers like Mozilla, Firefox, Opera, Galeon, and Konqueror. Mozilla, Firefox, and Opera are nice cross-platform browsers with all kinds of neat features, so don't be afraid to standardize on one of them.
Linux

Tuneups and Tweaks for the Better Spam-Trap

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 3071 Comments
Tutorial quote: In parts 1 and 2 of our thrilling "Building an Anti-Virus/Anti-Spam Gateway" series, we covered the basic steps for setting up SpamAssassin and Clam Anti-virus with Postfix. This installment is devoted to testing and tweaking, and creating whitelists in Amavisd-new. Whitelists are essential when you set up any kind of spam filtering: It's the best way to make sure your wanted mail gets through.
Linux

Feed Your Virus Worries to a Clam

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 3269 Comments
Tutorial quote: Last week, we looked at how to set up SpamAssassin with Postfix, as part of a lean, mean, spam-killing gateway machine. This week we'll add an anti-virus scanner to our bubbling brew.
Linux

SpamAssassin and Amavisd

Post date: April 14, 2005, 13:04 Category: Network Views: 3181 Comments
Tutorial quote: The bad news is, it's SpamAssassin, not SpammerAssassin. The good news is it kills spam quite effectively, and fits nicely into an anti-spam, anti-virus gateway. This article, which shows how to use SpamAssassin with Postfix, is the first in a series on building an anti-spam and anti-virus gateway. This gateway works equally well for a single PC, or for a large network.
Linux

Prep for Tomorrow with an IPv6 Testbed

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 2785 Comments
Tutorial quote: Yes, friends, I am afraid you do have to start paying attention to IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6). It's on its way, it's inevitable, and us ace network admins must learn to use it.
Linux

Upstream Provider Woes? Point the Ping of Blame

Post date: April 14, 2005, 12:04 Category: Network Views: 2899 Comments
Tutorial quote: Your users are complaining that "the Internet is, like, all slow." Users are always complaining, but you're seeing a lot of timeouts when you check mail, surf the Web, or try to log in for remote administration. Or even worse, latency is so bad that you keep getting killed all to heck in your favorite gory violent online multi-player game, so you know there is a problem. But there a lot of potential bottlenecks between your PC and the outside world, like your Internet gateway, proxy server, firewall, Internet service provider, and so forth, so where do you begin?

One of the best and most versatile network tools you can have is a notebook PC running Linux. This lets you plug in anywhere to run tests and find out what is going on. Make it a nothing-to-lose box--don't keep data on it so you can wipe and reinstall the operating system as necessary, because you want to be able to run tests outside of firewalls. Don't run any services. You can put a minimal iptables firewall on it, as there is no point in being totally exposed, but keep it simple. (Use MondoRescue to make a system snapshot for fast restores.)
Solaris

Configuring Apache

Post date: April 13, 2005, 05:04 Category: Network Views: 4722 Comments
Tutorial quote: Apache can respond to browser requests from machines on your local network (i.e. an "Intranet" Web server) or from the Internet. The installation of the Solaris OS installed and set up most of the necessary Apache files. As a result, if you want to use your system as a Web server you only need to modify one file.
Solaris

Configuring Sendmail

Post date: April 13, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 4612 Comments
Tutorial quote: Sendmail has the reputation of having the most hideous configuration file in the history of mankind. It's extremely long and incredibly cryptic. However, it is this very complexity that has made it the most popular MTA (Mail Transport Agent) on the Internet. Its' flexibility allows sendmail to handle the most demanding, disjointed mail routing and serving configurations you can dream up.
Solaris

Configuring networking

Post date: April 13, 2005, 03:04 Category: Network Views: 5894 Comments
Tutorial quote: Networking information in Solaris is stored in text files. Configuration is done by filling in the appriopriate data to these files and invoking specific commands in a terminal window.
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